Austin Bay

Somalia's pirates have a big problem on their hands -- in the form of their greatest prize, the Saudi-owned oil tanker the Sirius Star.

The Sirius Star has 2 million barrels of oil on board and is one of at least 15 "prize" ships now anchored off the Somali coast. According to the pirates, the ship's crew of 25 is well-fed and well-treated. They have joined another 300 captive sailors taken from other hijacked vessels.

And add $30 million to these impressive numbers. That's an unofficial figure for the ransoms paid over the last year by shipping companies to Somali pirates to free crews, cargoes and vessels

From a sea crook's perspective, a freighter fleet and $30 million in cash isn't a problem, it's success. The cash roll may seem small by Wall Street bailout stands, but $30 million goes a long way in Puntland.

Remember the Land of Punt? Egyptian Queen Hapshetsut sent an expedition to Punt in the 15th century B.C. This A.D. 21st century "Puntland" is north of Mogadishu on the "elbow" of the Horn of Africa. Puntland claimed independence from "Mogadishu control" in 1998 -- which makes Puntland a separatist "state-let" of a sort.

Puntland, however, like most of anarchy-plagued Somalia, has no real government except gangsters with guns, making the miserable place a near-perfect criminal haven. The Puntland port of Eyl brags about its "piracy industry."

That may seem a bit media deaf, bragging about piratical success, but Eyl's residents have a sympathetic cover story incorporating an environmentalist touch with a pitch reminiscent of Cold War-era "Third World solidarity" propaganda. Their local fishing catch has diminished, and they blame the big ships. Ships shouldn't pass through their waters for free. Thus pirates are just heavily armed toll-booth operators.

The pirates shrug at media attention. Media interest has spiked before, then Oprah and Geraldo lost interest. For example, in fall 2005, Somali pirates attacked the cruise ship Seabourn Spirit. They failed when the liner's crew fought back. The crew maneuvered the ship and used its huge wake as a weapon against the pirates' speedboats. The crew also employed a non-lethal "directional parabolic audio boom-box," a "sonic weapon" that emits an eardrum-shattering sound. The pirates retreated. The headlines came and went.


Austin Bay

Austin Bay is the author of three novels. His third novel, The Wrong Side of Brightness, was published by Putnam/Jove in June 2003. He has also co-authored four non-fiction books, to include A Quick and Dirty Guide to War: Third Edition (with James Dunnigan, Morrow, 1996).
 
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