Armstrong Williams
In this modern era, in the United States, we often find ourselves, as voting adults, faced with a choice between the lesser of two evils. Take, for instance, the high-profile Senate race in Nevada where one of the most unpopular sitting elected officials in the nation, U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, a Democrat, is neck and neck with someone whose only real selling point is that she’s – well, it’s simple: she’s not Harry Reid. I don’t mean to disparage Sharron Angle. I’m only saying that Nevadans don’t seem particularly high on her. Nevada independents and moderates – who usually decide general elections – are not rushing to vote for a woman who wants to abolish the Department of Education, privatize Social Security, and who recently told a radio station she believes she was called of God to run for the Senate. (It’s important for me to note here, especially given my unabashed belief in the importance of faith in public life, that I am not mocking or ridiculing Angle’s belief that God called her to run for the Senate. I am merely commenting on the effect her claim might have on her chances of eventually capturing Reid’s Senate seat. And I, as do most Christians, understand what she was probably trying to say, which is that she feels God’s will for her is to run for the Senate seat, win or lose. After all, many people feel, after long prayer, that God blesses their desires to be, say, a school teacher. I, as a matter of fact, believe God has answered my prayers in allowing me to use the talents he’s blessed me with in my own career. The prudence of making such a claim on the campaign trail is another matter entirely, and it’s one that, instead of making her the presumptive Senator-elect from Nevada, has made her “the lesser of two evils” in the minds of key Nevada voters.)

And then there are the Florida races where the negativity has sunk to new lows. The Miami Herald called the GOP primary for governor a “slugfest” in which the candidates’ negative ads are leaving a bad taste in voters’ mouths and inadvertently raising the prospects of the Democratic candidate winning the governorship. About the Senate race in that state, an August 2010 article by the Associated Press starts out this way: “The level of political discourse in the Democratic Senate primary boils down to: Your celebrity friends are low lifes. Response: So's your mom.” The article goes on to say that the two Democratic candidates’ positions on the issues that matter are basically the same. How sad that Democratic voters are forced into deciding between two adults who act like juveniles in middle school on the campaign trail!

The nastiness described above will help me illustrate what I refer to as the “biology of truth.”


Armstrong Williams

Armstrong Williams is a widely-syndicated columnist, CEO of the Graham Williams Group, and hosts the Armstrong Williams Show. He is the author of Reawakening Virtues.
 
TOWNHALL DAILY: Be the first to read Armstrong Williams' column. Sign up today and receive Townhall.com daily lineup delivered each morning to your inbox.