Dan Crenshaw Details the Advice He Gave Pete Davidson After Worrying Instagram Post

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Posted: Dec 18, 2018 3:30 PM
Dan Crenshaw Details the Advice He Gave Pete Davidson After Worrying Instagram Post

In the days following “Saturday Night Live” cast member Pete Davidson’s post on Instagram, saying he did not want to be on this Earth anymore, Congressman-elect Dan Crenshaw (R-Texas) revealed he had a phone conversation with him to give some advice.

“I really don’t want to be on this earth anymore,” Davidson wrote in a now deleted Instagram post. “I’m doing my best to stay here for you but I actually don’t know how much longer i can last. all I’ve ever tried to do was help people. just remember I told you so.”

Telling KPRC 2 Houston anchor Khambrel Marshall that it was “devastating” to see Davidson reaching a point to where he put out a cry for help on social media.

“I talked to him personally yesterday and talked to him a for a little bit about it,” Crenshaw said. “You know, we don’t go back very far, we’re not good friends, but I think he appreciated hearing from me.”

“What I told him was this: everyone has a purpose in this world,” Crenshaw continued. “God put you here for a reason, but it’s your job to find that purpose, ok, and you should live that way. You should live that way, always seeking out that purpose, not expecting to be given to you by anyone else. Know that you have value and you do more good than you realize for people.”

The relationship between Davidson and Crenshaw has proven to be a valuable lesson in forgiveness and admitting when a mistake was made.

After the SNL comedian poked fun at the Navy SEAL veteran’s war injury, which was not that funny to begin with, Crenshaw appeared on SNL alongside Davidson and was able to take a few shots himself before going into more serious topics.

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"There’s a lot of lessons to learn here. Not just that the left and right can agree on some things, but also this – Americans can forgive one another,” Crenshaw stated. “We can remember what brings us together as a country and still see the good in each other.”