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Tipsheet

Ducking WH Press, Obama Fields Tough Questions on Food, Music, Super Hero Powers

Good thing the RNC made clear that their new web ad is not a parody:
 


 

"Red or green ?"

"What's your favorite New Mexican food?"

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"What's your favorite song to work out to?"

"If you had a super power, what would it be?"

"I just flirted with the President of the United States of America!"
 

Meanwhile:
 

President Obama hasn’t formally taken questions from the White House press corps in more than two months, while on the campaign trail in Iowa yesterday he made time for reporters from People Magazine and Entertainment Tonight. His last news conference was at the G20 in June, when he answered six questions from three reporters on the European debt crisis, the conflict in Syria, and the notion of politics stopping at the water’s edge. The White House press corps has not formally been given the opportunity to ask questions of the president on U.S. soil since his appearance in the Briefing Room on June 8 (when he said “the private sector is doing fine.“) His last formal White House news conference was on March 6.

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And:
 

Unemployment rates rose in July from June in almost all U.S. states, including those where the presidential election fight is expected to be fiercest, according to data released on Friday by the Labor Department. Altogether, jobless rates rose in 44 states, dropped in Idaho, Rhode Island and the District of Columbia, and were unchanged in four states in July from June. As the country moves closer to November's election day, voters' attention is squarely focused on the economy and a national jobless rate hovering above 8 percent.


Red or green?

 

Update (LB): MSNBC's Andrea Mitchell grills DWS on the matter:

 

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