Whoever Edited this Clip About Biden Deserves Major Props...And Trump Certainly Noticed It
'ISIS Dry Run'? We Know How Two Jordanians Tried to Infiltrate a US...
'Wait, They Left': College Kids Stumped By Simple Questions About Israel and Hamas
Morehouse Might Cancel Graduation Ceremonies 'On the Spot' if This Happens During Biden's...
What if Biden Wins in November? Part One
ICE Blames Biden Admin for Illegal Immigrant Murder
Trump Scores Huge Donation From Unexpected Group
Democrat Fraudster Begs Joe Biden to Pardon Her
CNN Analyst Shocked By Trump's Surge In Support Among Surprising Group
NYT Claims Justice Samuel Alito Sent 'Stop the Steal' Message Outside His Home
Why These Voters Say the Trump Trial Is Backfiring on Democrats
Trades Keep America Running, and We Need Them Now More Than Ever!
Sham Elections Garner Farcical 8 Percent Support in Iran
Heil Harvard!
A Californian Visits the U.S.A.
Tipsheet

Gibson Guitars and the DOJ: The Investigation Is Ongoing

Last August, in a strange fit of regulatory scrupulousness (as Katie pointed out at the time, they didn't seem to be nearly as fastidious when funneling thousands of illegal guns to Mexican drug cartels), the Department of Justice swooped into Gibson Guitar factories in Memphis and Nashville, interrupting productivity with the claim that the musical instrument manufacturer might be using certain "illegal" imported woods. Six months later, however, the DOJ still hasn't filed charges -- surprise, surprise. Thanks to Reason.tv for following up with this shining example of bureaucratic incompetence and inefficiency:

Advertisement

"They...come in with weapons, they seized a half-million dollars worth of property, they shut our factory down, and they have not charged us with anything," says Gibson Guitars CEO Henry Juszkiewicz, referring to the August 2011 raid on his Nashville and Memphis factories by agents from the Departments of Homeland Security and Fish & Wildlife.

The feds raided Gibson for using an inappropriate tariff code on wood from India, which is a violation of the anti-trafficking statute known as The Lacey Act. At issue is not whether the wood in question was endangered, but whether the wood was the correct level of thickness and finish before being exported from India. "India is wanting to ensure that raw wood is not exported without some labor content from India," says Juskiewicz.

Join the conversation as a VIP Member

Recommended

Trending on Townhall Videos

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement