Just When You Think These Democrats Would Distance Themselves From Controversy

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Posted: Dec 19, 2020 8:00 PM
Just When You Think These Democrats Would Distance Themselves From Controversy

Source: AP Photo/Brynn Anderson

On Sunday, both Georgia Democratic Senate candidates, Jon Ossoff and Rev. Raphael Warnock, are set to appear at a get-out-the-vote rally with a staunch supporter of the controversial anti-Semite, Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan. 

Fox News reports the two Democratic candidates will participate in a forum with fellow panelists Derrick Johnson, CEO of the NAACP. and Dr. David E. Marion, chairman of the Howard University’s National Pan-Hellenic Council of Presidents.

Dr. Marion initiated controversial pastor Louis Farrakhan into the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity by awarding Farrakhan with an honorary membership, according to the official newspaper of the Nation of Islam, Final Call.

"Thank you to my brothers of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc. for presenting me with an Honorary Membership," Farrakhan wrote in a tweet. "As long as we live, let’s strive for those fundamental principles that make an Omega Man a man after God."

Sharing a stage with a staunch supporter of Farrakhan is likely to raise a few eyebrows, given the Nation of Islam leader's anti-Semitic remarks over the years. As Fox News recalls, Farrakhan referred to Adolf Hitler as a "very great man" and has called Jews "termites." 

Such hate has a strong foothold in the Democratic Party, and Rev. Raphael Warnock sure surrounds himself with some shady characters. In 2014, Warnock hosted the controversial Rev. Jeremiah Wright as a guest preacher at his church. 

Rev. Wright railed against the United States in a sermon delivered shortly after the U.S. invasion of Afghanistan in 2003. 

"Not God bless America; God damn America," Wright said at the time. "That’s in the Bible, for killing innocent people. God damn America, for treating her citizens as less than human. God damn America as long as she tries to act like she is God and she is supreme."

Warnock has repeatedly defended Wright's comments, calling it a "very fine sermon" and in keeping with "the truth-telling tradition of the Black Church." Warnock also didn't shy away in 2009 when Rev. Wright blamed Jews for interfering with his access to then-President Barack Obama, who himself had the sense to distance himself from the controversial pastor during his run for president.

As much as Warnock and the Democrats have done to distance Warnock from these anti-Semitic remarks, known anti-Semites are lining up to rally Georgians. 

The Georgia chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) and the Georgia Muslim Project are holding a virtual "vote-a-thon" that includes none other than Reps. Ilhan Omar and Rashida Tlaib and Women's March co-founder Linda Sarsour.

And Warnock has a number of controversial comments of his own. 

"America, nobody can serve God and the military," Warnock said in 2011. "You can’t serve God and money..."

Warnack is also under fire for having interfered with a child abuse investigation, for his church's decision to welcome communist dictator Fidel Castro, and various other statements Warnock has made in support of Marxism and the like.

Rev. Warnock is facing off against Republican Incumbent Sen. Kelly Loeffler in Georgia's Jan. 5 runoff. Loeffler has called Warnock "too extreme" for Georgia.