FLASHBACK: Every Time Dem Senators Called for a SCOTUS Hearing and Vote

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 @eb454
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Posted: Sep 26, 2020 10:35 AM
FLASHBACK: Every Time Dem Senators Called for a SCOTUS Hearing and Vote

Source: AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Senate Democrats are doing everything in their power to block President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee from being voted on and confirmed. Their thought is that the next president – in their mind Joe Biden – should be the one making the nomination. What's rich is that back in 2016, when President Barack Obama nominated Judge Merrick Garland, Democrats continually pushed Republicans to "do their job" and vote on the nomination. Fast forward four years later and suddenly the rules that applied to their president don't apply here.

"The language is explicit: he 'shall appoint' and, with the advisement and consent of the Senate, shall fill the vacancies on the Supreme Court," Minority Whip Dick Durbin (D-IL) said back in 2016.

"The Constitution, as Dick [Durbin] outlined, the Constitution very clearly lays out the job the Senate has to do when it comes to filling the Supreme Court vacancy," Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) explained.

"The Supreme Court needs nine justices to function properly. It is vital to our judicial system," Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) said. "So, Republicans, we say this: Just do your job. Just do what you're sent here to do."

"A vacancy on the most important Court in America. Do your job!" Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) explained. "Vote for a Supreme Court nominee."

"A president is elected for all four years. Our responsibility to provide advice and consent goes on continuously," Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-OR) said.

This, folks, is another example of hypocrisy. Back in 2016, Democrats believed the GOP had an obligation to vote on Garland's nomination. The difference was Republicans knew the numbers weren't there to have Garland confirmed. They could have brought the issue up for a vote but the GOP controlled the Senate. There was no way there was going to be a confirmation. What makes 2020 vastly different is the Senate and the White House are not part of a divided government. The votes are there for President Trump's pick.