Report: Clinton Continued To Email Classified Information After Leaving State Department

Matt Vespa
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Posted: Aug 31, 2016 1:00 PM
Report: Clinton Continued To Email Classified Information After Leaving State Department

We know about the 15,000 additional emails the FBI found that Clinton didn’t turn over last week. Katie wrote yesterday that an additional 30 related to Benghazi weren’t handed over either. Well, she deleted them.

"I provided all of my emails that could possibly be work related," Clinton said on March 10, 2015. It’s one of the many lies ad half-truths that have shot many holes through the Clinton narrative about her email usage that has plagued her for over a year. Now, Daniel Halper at the New York Post reports that the former first lady continued to email classified information after leaving the State Department:

Hillary Clinton continued sending classified information even after leaving the State Department, The Post has exclusively learned.

On May 28, 2013, months after stepping down as secretary of state, Clinton sent an email to a group of diplomats and top aides about the “123 Deal” with the United Arab Emirates.

[…]

The email from Clinton was sent from the email account — hrod17@clintonemail.com — associated with her private email server.

[…]

The “123 Deal” was a 2009 agreement between the United Arab Emirates and the US on materials and technological sharing for nuclear energy production.

Halper added that the emails were obtained by the Republican National Committee through a FOIA request and were heavily redacted since it contained classified information. He added the markings on the email show that this record shouldn’t be declassified until May 28, 2033.

Guy has written, which Halper also mentioned, that there are thousands of emails containing classified information on Clinton’s email server—2,101 emails to be exact.

So, is this the start of another terrible, horrible, no good very bad week for Hillary Clinton?

Classified information being sent out on an unsecure server about an Arab country's future nuclear energy production project—dear lord, lady.