In Memoriam: Five Abraham Lincoln Quotations

Daniel Doherty
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Posted: Apr 15, 2015 5:00 PM
In Memoriam: Five Abraham Lincoln Quotations

President Abraham Lincoln died 150 years ago today. He was assassinated – and his life and his achievements are well known to all Americans. And while the memorial dedicated in his honor in Washington, D.C. describes him as the savior of the Union, he was more than that. He was also a prolific writer and speaker who had a unique ability to turn a phrase. The following therefore are excerpts from five of my favorite writings (and speeches) Lincoln delivered before his untimely death in 1865. In chronological order they are as follows:

Lincoln’s ‘First Public Address’ (March 9, 1832):

Upon the subject of education, not presuming to dictate any plan or system respecting it, I can only say that I view it as the most important subject which we, as a people, can be engaged in. That every man may receive at least a moderate education, and thereby be enabled to read the histories of his own and other countries, by which he may duly appreciate the value of our free institutions, appears to be an object of vital importance, even on this account alone, to say nothing of the advantages and satisfaction to be derived from all being able to read the Scriptures and other works, both of a religious and moral nature, for themselves.

Lincoln’s ‘House Divided Speech’ (June 16, 1858):

"A house divided against itself cannot stand." I believe this government cannot endure, permanently half slave and half free. I do not expect the Union to be dissolved -- I do not expect the house to fall -- but I do expect it will cease to be divided. It will become all one thing or all the other. Either the opponents of slavery, will arrest the further spread of it, and place it where the public mind shall rest in the belief that it is in the course of ultimate extinction; or its advocates will push it forward, till it shall become alike lawful in all the States, old as well as new -- North as well as South. Have we no tendency to the latter condition?

Lincoln’s ‘Farewell Address’ (February 1, 1861):

My friends, no one, not in my situation, can appreciate my feeling of sadness at this parting. To this place, and the kindness of these people, I owe everything. Here I have lived a quarter of a century, and have passed from a young to an old man. Here my children have been born, and one is buried. I now leave, not knowing when, or whether ever, I may return, with a task before me greater than that which rested upon Washington.

Lincoln’s ‘First Inaugural Address’ (March 4, 1861):

I am loath to close. We are not enemies, but friends. We must not be enemies. Though passion may have strained, it must not break our bonds of affection. The mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battle-field, and patriot grave, to every living heart and hearth-stone, all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union, when again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature.

Lincoln’s ‘Second Inaugural Address’ (March 4, 1865):

With malice toward none; with charity for all; with firmness in the right, as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in; to bind up the nation's wounds; to care for him who shall have borne the battle, and for his widow, and his orphan--to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace, among ourselves, and with all nations.