At his health care pep rally today, President Obama was introduced by Connie Anderson, sister of Natoma Canfield.  The president said it was a touching letter written to him from Canfield that brought him to Ohio.  (I'm sure the decision had nothing to do with rustbelt America being the source of Democrats' vote deficit at this point...)

In her letter, Canfield described her battle with cancer how she was forced to give up her health insurance after it became too costly--a sad story, to be sure.  But, as Gateway Pundit reports, not likely an entirely true story:
Natoma Canfield is 50 years old. She was diagnosed with cancer 16 years ago. She quit her job or was laid off 12 years ago. She has reportedly held odd jobs cleaning homes the last few years. Natoma was paying $5,000 a year for her insurance but dropped it after it went up to $8,000. She wrote president Obama in December to tell him about it. She was worried she might lose her home. Some people might say she’s lucky to still have a home after losing her job 12 years ago.

Barack Obama came to Ohio today to prop Natoma up on stage with him. But, Natoma Canfield couldn’t make it. She is back in the hospital. (Our prayers for a quick recovery) She is getting cared for despite the fact that she has no insurance. She’s not out on the street. She’s not a statistic like Rep Alan Grayson would have you believe. Natoma is getting the care she needs.
And if Canfield were in favor of real reform, she should encourage President Obama to change the tax code to help insurers properly pool risks instead of additional taxation and government subsidies. 

In addition, if the president really wanted to help people like Ms. Canfield, he would encourage the individual ownership rights over health care plans so the American people can maintain control over their health insurance, not employers or the government.