Katie Pavlich

Even if you have no desire to live in a Chevy Volt "community," you're paying for it. Chevy Volt sales are pathetically low so the company is partnering with the liberal city of Austin, Texas to build a green test community. They might have to gather all the Chevy Volts ever sold to fill this place up.

Maybe it should be renamed "Chevrolet Volt-ville." The largest concentration of Chevrolet Volts in the country will play a key role in helping Texas residents in a 700-acre planned community as they test the impact of "smart homes" and other green technology, like electronic vehicles.

GM calls it the greatest concentration of Chevrolet Volts in the world.

"This partnership provides us with a unique opportunity to observe charging details with many real customers in a concentrated setting," said Nick Pudar, an OnStar vice president, in a statement.

OnStar and General Motors have become official partners of Pecan Street Inc., the country's first nonprofit research and development consortia, where residents agreed to be part of a clean-energy smart grid test for sustainable living. The Mueller community, 3 miles outside Austin, provides a real-life lab for the automaker to observe charging patterns and how consumers and clean-energy technologies interact and support electric-vehicle charging. The project runs for five years.

While Chevrolet made 100 Volts available, only 55 of the community residents took advantage of the various tax credits, including a $7,500 federal tax credit and a $7,500 rebate from Pecan Street on their Volt purchases. Those leasing a Volt for three or more years received a $3,000 rebate.

"We're gathering information from families' vehicles throughout this community to find out the direct impact the Volt has on the grid and how to get drivers the lowest possible charging rates," said Pudar. "This project will also help us develop future capabilities of the Volt and other plug-in electric vehicles."

Pecan Street is funded by a $10.4 million grant from the Energy Department and more than $14 million in matching funds from project partners.

With President Obama's ongoing war on coal (greenies, this is where most electricity in America comes from to power your electric cars), I'm not really understanding how this whole thing will work, not to mention how it's supposed to be "sustainable."

Obama’s War on Coal has already taken a remarkable toll on coal-fired power plants in America.

Last week the U.S. Energy Information Administration reported a shocking drop in power sector coal consumption in the first quarter of 2012. Coal-fired power plants are now generating just 36 percent of U.S. electricity, versus 44.6 percent just one year ago.

It’s the result of an unprecedented regulatory assault on coal that will leave us all much poorer.



Katie Pavlich

Katie Pavlich is the Editor at Townhall.com. Follow her on Twitter @katiepavlich. She is a New York Times Best Selling author. Her latest book Assault and Flattery: The Truth About the Left and Their War on Women, was published on July 8, 2014.



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