Guy Benson

As per usual, I don't particularly care what some jackass comedian has to say about politics, but I do pay a bit more attention to what a jackass million-dollar Obama Super PAC donor has to say on world events.  Watch as Maher cops to his own total ignorance about the scandal ("until this week"), ridicules conservatives for "living in a bubble," then claims that Republicans don't actually care that several hundred Mexicans were slaughtered by F&F guns:
 


If Republicans "don't care" about these murdered Mexicans, how would Maher describe Democrats' attitude toward their deaths?  The GOP has been trying to get to the bottom of this mess and hold people responsible; Democrats have responded by stonewalling, asserting bogus "privilege," and denouncing the investigation.  It's also curious that Maher didn't bother to mention Brian Terry in his description of the bloody saga.  I mean, the man only happens to be the US border agent was cut down by a high-powered weapon provided to a foreign criminal enterprise by the government whose territorial sovereignty he was charged with protecting.  Maher's rendering of events suggested that the victims were just a bunch of Mexicans who would have died anyway -- so there's nothing to see here.  But remember, it's conservatives who don't care about those deaths, according to him.  Meanwhile, Washington Post reporter Aaron Blake told fired MSNBC host David Shuster that the public isn't interested in this boring "process" issue:
 

BLAKE: Well, you know only time's gonna tell on something like this. I think that when you get in the weeds and you’re talking about process arguments like this, I think most of the American people tend to tune it out. I don’t think that the Fast and Furious situation right now really rises up on the radar for most people.


I know Aaron from around town, and he seems like a decent guy, but Fast & Furious is not about "process."  Sure, there are sharp disagreements over whether executive privilege should apply, and discussions of what might happen after a potential contempt vote -- but at its core, this scandal is about an appallingly reckless policy that cost hundreds of people their lives.  It's also about the ongoing cover up.  An applicable example of a dull "process" debate was the Left's conniption over President Bush's entirely legal firing of a group of US Attorneys.  As far as political scandals go, Fast & Furious is about as "exciting" (pardon the term) as they come: Guns, blood, death, victims, lies, investigations, retractions, and a fist-fight between Congress and the executive branch.  Leave it to the press to try to shrug it off as the latest partisan "process" squabble between the two parties.  The New York Post's John Podhoretz calls out the galling double standard at play:
 

There’s a reason you don’t know much about the complicated and confusing mess known as “Fast and Furious.” The mainstream media have largely ignored this Obama administration scandal, which would have dominated mainstream front pages and homepages and programs for months had it all taken place under a Republican administration...The fact that a story as juicy as this one has been given short shrift already makes laughable the continued assertion by media panjandrums that they possess no bias toward the Obama administration. If things continue this way, it will be an admission that they’ve assigned themselves the job of serving as the president’s blocking guard.


Can anyone persuasively dispute Podhoretz's assertion that Fast & Furious would be getting blockbuster treatment if it were a Republican administration's doing?
 

UPDATE - Oh my: The full House will hold a contempt vote against Eric Holder on Thursday.  Say, isn't there something else of significance happening in DC that day?  What a day that will be.

Guy Benson

Guy Benson is Townhall.com's Senior Political Editor. Follow him on Twitter @guypbenson.

Author Photo credit: Jensen Sutta Photography