Greg Hengler

Over at National Review, Lee Habeeb (an Arab himself) asks this simple question: Why do the Arabs really hate Jews? His answer is honest and clear. Here's part of his answer:

Two reasons: fear, and envy.

To the dismay of Arabs around the world, Jewish people turned an ancient piece of real estate in the Middle East into a thriving oasis of intellectual, political, religious, and commercial activity, where people are free to do as they please. One of the oldest places on earth — a place where Abraham walked — Israel is as thoroughly modern as any place on earth, with a functioning government that respects religious and economic freedom.

A young person in Israel can choose to work in some of the best high-tech companies in the world, or can pursue a life dedicated to Talmudic studies. A woman has an equal right to pursue any career she likes, and people of different sexual orientations are not driven underground — or worse.

The fact is, the God-given talents of the people of Israel are allowed to flourish in ways Arabs should want to emulate, and replicate.

Habeeb continues by describing a a very smart Jordanian friend of his who exemplifies this "fear and envy" towards Jews:

I ask him why he is obsessed with the 1967 border dispute, and not some other border grudge, as it would not take long to find other countries unhappy with the ways in which territories were allocated as spoils of various 19th- and 20th-century wars.

I tell him that using his logic, Mexican terrorists should be blowing themselves up in Houston and El Paso. And they should have his unwavering support to compel America to return Texas to its rightful, original owner.

Ouch! Habeeb goes on:

Benjamin Netanyahu once gave a speech in which he pointed at a map of the Middle East. He rattled off many of the countries in the region, and the relative size of those nations to Israel. Jordan is four times the size of Israel, Iraq 20, Egypt 46; Saudi Arabia is nearly 90 times the size of Israel.

“Big countries,” he said. “But small accomplishments.”

He then went on to describe Israel, which is just slightly bigger than one of America’s smallest states, New Jersey.

“Little country,” he concluded. “But big accomplishments.”

And there you have it, in one perfectly formulated binary.

Check out the full piece at National Review.