Elisabeth Meinecke

What would a world without a strong America look like?

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Some say American clout is waning—that we’ve declined relative to others, especially with the rise (or re-rise) of China, Russia, India and Brazil, which have been developing into major powers in recent years. Indeed, there seems to be plenty of people out there, especially abroad—and perhaps a few at home, sadly—who would welcome the absolute decline of American strength and influence across the globe.

To those who naively feel this way, another old adage applies: Be careful what you wish for.

In the July issue, which is shipping to subscribers now, Peter Brookes makes the case for why a strong America is more vital than ever to international stability. "Why the World Needs a Strong America" shows the many contributions of the United States around the globe and will make you proud to be American.

The full story is available in the next issue of Townhall Magazine. Here are a few excerpts:
 

While it has never been our preference, we have been a force for stability, providing American “can-do” spirit to problems and places that many Americans have never even heard of, muchl ess been to.The fact is the world doesn’t look to other big powers likeChina or Russia when there isa pressing problem for the so-called “international community,” knowing Beijing and Moscow are willing to look the other way unless they’re directly affected or happy to let someone else do the heavy lifting (usually Washington).

The world, instead, looks to the United States as the country with the will and capability to make things happen—and to do so in some
of the planet’s toughest neighborhoods. This, of course, comes courtesy of the world’s best military. It’s the only one with a true global, we-can-get-there-supply-ourselves-get-the- job-done-and-get-home type of mobility and sustainability that is the envy of all other armed forces.

But it’s not just U.S. military muscle that makes us unique. We also have strong diplomatic forces in embassies, consulates and international institutions that span the globe, giving us sway and a say on important issues. It doesn’t hurt that we also have the world’s largest and
arguably most innovative economy, based on the free market. In fact, it’s a major source of our strength, bolstering our efforts
around the globe.

We’re the hardest workers, too. We spend more time in the office, the factory and out in the farm fields than just about anyone else. Even the United Nations has said the United States “leads the world in productivity.”

Fortunately, we also have the world’s finest intelligence services, from the Central Intelligence Agency to the Defense Intelligence Agency. They don’t always get it right, but intelligence is a tough business, and they get it right a lot more than they get it wrong.



U.S. intelligence assets, especially satellites, provide critical information to the international community, including early warning of crises and ongoing support during hostilities or humanitarian emergencies on a scale no one else can.

Washington has also been key in conducting humanitarian relief operations to tsunami victims in Southeast Asia and Japan and to those struggling in the aftermath of the devastating earthquakes in Pakistan and Haiti.

In addition, the American medical ship USNS Mercy and other U.S. Navy ships ply the Seven Seas performing numerous humanitarian missions around the world every year, bringing much-needed help to those without access to basic medical care. ...

Never has one country done so much for so many -- and for so little thanks -- as the United States. 

Order Townhall Magazine today to ensure you get the full case for a strong America, and much more, in the July issue.


Elisabeth Meinecke

Elisabeth Meinecke is TOWNHALL MAGAZINE Managing Editor. Follow her on Twitter @lismeinecke.