Christine Rousselle

One of the major points of contention in the new abortion restriction bill in Texas was the requirement that doctors who perform abortions must acquire admitting privileges to nearby hospitals. This portion of the law was briefly struck down by a Texas judge. Abortion proponents claimed that requiring physicians to receive admitting privileges was an undue burden on a woman and was designed to force clinics to close, while abortion opponents believe that requiring doctors to have admitting privileges would make the procedure safer for women.

Real doctors, on the other hand, are fairly supportive of requiring doctors to have admitting privileges at hospitals.

From Live Action News:

In 2003, an ACS/AMA (American College of Surgeons, American Medical Association) had a meeting which was chaired by LaMar S. McGinnis, Jr., MD, FACS, of the ACS and Clair Callan, MD, of the AMA. The participants unanimously came to the conclusion that:

“Physicians performing office-based surgery must have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital, a transfer agreement with another physician who has admitting privileges at a nearby hospital, or maintain an emergency transfer agreement with a nearby hospital.”

The following groups all signed off on this regulation:

1. Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care

2. American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery,

3. American Academy of Dermatology,

4. American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery,

5. American Academy of Ophthalmology,

6. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons,

7. American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery,

8. American Academy of Pediatrics,

9. American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities,

10. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists,

11. American College of Surgeons,

12. American Medical Association,

13. American Osteopathic Association,

14. American Society for Dermatologic Surgery,

15. American Society for Reproductive Medicine,

16. American Society of Anesthesiologists,

17. American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery,

18. American Society of General Surgeons,

19. American Society of Plastic Surgeons,

20. American Urological Association,

21. Federation of State Medical Boards,

22. Indiana State Medical Society,

23. Institute for Medical Quality-California Medical Association,

24. Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations,

25. Kansas Medical Society,

26. Massachusetts Medical Society,

27. Medical Association of the State of Alabama,

28. Medical Society of the State of New York,

29. Missouri State Medical Association,

30. National Committee for Quality Assurance,

31. Pennsylvania Medical Society, and

32. Society of Interventional Radiology.

In fact, there was not a single organization involved in the meeting that did not agree that board certification should be the standard for all outpatient surgery. It was unanimous.

Psh, what possibly could actual doctors know?


Christine Rousselle

Christine Rousselle is a web editor with Townhall.com. Follow her on Twitter at @crousselle.

Author Photo credit: Jensen Sutta Photography