Mike Adams
Recommend this article

Recently, I have been getting a lot of complaints about the lack of diversity in my opinion column. The Feminazi Party has been complaining that I write about abortion too often. The Gaystapo has been complaining that I write about homosexuality too often. Atheists have been complaining that I write about God too often. College administrators have been complaining that I write about college administrators too often. I just can’t win. So, today, I’m going to dedicate my column to the topic of self-defense weapons just in case a lesbian feminist atheist college administrator goes off the deep end. I meant to say, “Even further off the deep end.” These five guns top my list of good, reliable self-defense weapons for the person, the automobile, and the home

1. Smith and Wesson J Frame Revolver. I recommend one carry weapon for summer and one for winter. My summer gun for the last fourteen years has been the Model 640. Men should carry a .357 revolver. They should also carry it in a stainless frame – especially if it is their summer weapon. Sweat all you like and the stainless J frame will take it. For women, I strongly urge the Model 638. Less recoil, but still enough stopping power. There is no need to drop down to a .380. The 38 has enough power and is both light enough and concealable enough for most women.

2. Smith and Wesson M&P Pistol. I carry a slightly larger gun with a larger capacity during the winter. I only do so because the extra clothing allows me to conceal a little more weapon. For years, my choice has been the Glock Model 23, chambered in .40 caliber. All of my friends in law enforcement have been trying to convince me that Smith now makes a superior pistol. I have finally seen the light. This is an affordable and reliable carry weapon. I strongly recommend that men carry the .40 caliber version. Women may want to opt for the 9mm version with less recoil. Either way, the Smith M&P is the way to go.

Recommend this article

Mike Adams

Mike Adams is a criminology professor at the University of North Carolina Wilmington and author of Letters to a Young Progressive: How To Avoid Wasting Your Life Protesting Things You Don't Understand.