Michelle Malkin

It's one thing for Hollywood moppets and television Muppets to protest Chick-fil-A over the fast-food chain president's support for traditional marriage. They're private citizens and entities. But when an elected public official wields the club of government against a Christian business in the name of "tolerance," it's not harmless kid stuff. It's chilling.

This week, Boston Mayor Thomas Menino declared, "Chick-fil-A doesn't belong in Boston." He recklessly slandered the company by accusing it of "discriminat(ing) against the population." And he warned ominously: "If they need licenses in the city, it will be very difficult -- unless they open up their policies."

Drawing on the city's history, he railed against the restaurant empire's plans to build a franchise near a famed path: "We're an open city. We're a city that's at the forefront of inclusion. That's the Freedom Trail. That's where it all started right here. And we're not going to have a company, Chick-fil-A or whatever the hell the name is, on our Freedom Trail."

Poverty is on track to rise to the highest nationwide levels since the 1960s. Boston's jobless rate has been stuck at 6 percent. The city's May employment numbers were revised downward for the second month in a row; in June, the city shed 2,600 jobs. Chick-fil-A employs some 50,000 workers across the country at 1,500 outlets in nearly 40 states and the District of Columbia. The company generates more than $2 billion in annual revenues and serves millions of happy customers looking for affordable food in a family-friendly setting.

Menino must have a darned good reason for meddling with government licensing decisions and turning away one of America's most successful private employers, right?

Wrong. Menino's beef with the beloved chicken sandwich supplier is as full of holes as Chick-fil-A's trademark waffle fries. It's Menino who is engaging in blatant viewpoint and religious discrimination against an out-and-proud company whose leadership embraces biblically based principles and values.

In an interview with the Baptist Press last month, Chick-fil-A President Dan Cathy talked about his personal support of traditional family values and fidelity. "(Guilty) as charged," he told the reporter. "We are a family-owned business, a family-led business, and we are married to our first wives. We give God thanks for that."


Michelle Malkin

Michelle Malkin is the author of "Culture of Corruption: Obama and his Team of Tax Cheats, Crooks & Cronies" (Regnery 2010).

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