Michael Brown

This past weekend, students and friends of our ministry school in North Carolina conducted a survey at the gay pride event in Charlotte. The survey was entitled, “Are You Open Minded?”, and it led to some fascinating interaction, highlighting the moral malaise of this generation.

But first, some of the results of the survey, which provided a random sampling of the multiplied thousands who attended Charlotte Pride.

Slightly more than 100 people responded to our questions, 52% female, 47% male, and one self-identified as genderqueer (this was in response to the category “other”; another respondent, while identifying as female, also described herself as man, woman, and transgender).

70% identified as gay (meaning gay or lesbian), 15% as straight, 11% as bisexual, 4% as pansexual (or omnisexual, meaning anything goes), and 2% as transgender (there was some overlap in the descriptions, and so the numbers total more than 100%).

The first question on the survey was, Do you agree with the statement, “I have the right to marry the one I love”?

Remarkably – but not surprisingly – the response was 100 Yes, 2 No. Talk about groupthink! Talk about a mass of people buying into an empty slogan!

As a follow-up question we asked, If so, are there any exceptions? (Polyamory? Polygamy? Consensual adult incest [opposite sex? same-sex?]? Age of consent for marriage?)

Although not as many responded to this, the results were 59 Yes, 23 No, meaning that almost 30% of the respondents said that there were no exceptions to the statement, “I have the right to marry the one I love.”

Some of the explanatory comments offered by the respondents included: “You’re into what you’re into, so do what you wanna do”; and, “No age of consent: if you love someone, go ahead and get married”; and, “To each his own”; and, “Whatever floats your boat, as long as it’s not hurting others.”

But of course. Once you buy into the “love is love” proposition, how can you draw a line, as long as the relationship is consensual?

For those stating that there were exceptions, most were concerned about age of consent (and so, issues like pedophilia) and incest (although few tried to explain what the problem with incest was, especially if it involved two adult brothers, eliminating the possibility of children being born to them). Some also felt that marriage should be limited to only two consenting adults, but with no further explanation offered.


Michael Brown

Michael Brown holds a Ph.D. in Near Eastern Languages and Literatures from New York University. He is the author of 25 books, including

Can You Be Gay and Christian?

, and he hosts the nationally syndicated, daily talk radio show, the Line of Fire. Follow him at AskDrBrown on Facebook or @drmichaellbrown on Twitter.