Matt Barber

Another day, another secularist attempt at religious cleansing.

The United States Supreme Court, which, with jaw-dropping irony, opens every session with prayer, recently heard – for the umpteenth time – oral arguments on whether local governing bodies can likewise open every session with prayer. (The U.S. Congress does it, too. Always has.)

The answer, of course, is a resounding “yes,” and, unless the high court goes completely off the rails this time (anything’s possible under its presently imbalanced liberal makeup), so it shall remain.

The case is Town of Greece v. Galloway. Hyper-litigious atheists – always on the prowl for a reason to be offended – sued the town of Greece in upstate New York for, you guessed it, opening its town meetings with prayer (you know, just like nearly every other legislative body in America has done since day one).

Despite overwhelming case precedent to the contrary – and putting the “activism” in “judicial activism” – the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals inexplicably ruled in favor of the atheists.

Notwithstanding, most objective legal scholars agree that the Supreme Court will overturn the lower court’s ruling. In light of our government’s well-documented prayer-based founding, as well as manifold rulings on past cases such as Marsh v. Chambers – which held that “legislative prayers” are “part of the fabric of our society” – even liberals on the high court will find it difficult, if not impossible, to uphold the 2nd Circuit.

Still, this case needn’t be a total waste of time and taxpayer money. Liberty Counsel, one of the fastest growing civil-rights firms in America, filed an amicus brief with the high court on behalf of the Town of Greece. The legal group has asked the court to, once and for all, clear the air on public prayer while, at the same time, making it less tempting for secularist radicals to file such frivolous and harassing lawsuits. (I recently discussed the case with Mat Staver, founder and chairman of Liberty Counsel, on “Faith and Freedom,” our national radio program. [Click here for video]).

In its “friend of the court” brief, Liberty Counsel has recommended that these nine justices take advantage of this otherwise obnoxious exercise in “been-there-done-that” and make liberty lemonade from atheist lemons.


Matt Barber

Matt Barber is founder and editor-in chief of BarbWire.com. He is an author, columnist, cultural analyst and an attorney concentrating in constitutional law. Having retired as an undefeated heavyweight professional boxer, Matt has taken his fight from the ring to the culture war. (Follow Matt on Twitter: @jmattbarber).