Larry Elder
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Dads matter.

President Barack Obama said it recently in Chicago, a city on track for 600 murders this year, the equivalent of two Sandy Hooks per month. Too bad he still does not understand that his left-wing ideology is the problem.

After the Sandy Hook tragedy, Obama, much of his party and much of the media have been calling for further gun control and advocating "common sense" measures such as limiting the number of rounds in a magazine, "universal" background checks and restrictions on "assault weapons."

But there is an 800-pound politically incorrect elephant in the room.

Most gun murders in America are committed by people of color, with the victims almost always people of color. Whites have the same access to firearms, listen to the same "urban" music and play the same violent video games. Why, then, do the murders disproportionally involve racial minorities, principally blacks and Hispanics, usually young men in urban settings, many with gang ties?

Obama, in Chicago, finally talked about the lack of fathers and the impact this has on crime rather than complain about the number of rounds in a magazine: "For a lot of young boys and young men in particular, they don't see an example of fathers or grandfathers, uncles, who are in a position to support families and be held up in respect. And so that means that this is not just a gun issue; it's also an issue of the kinds of communities that we're building. When a child opens fire on another child, there is a hole in that child's heart that government can't fill. Only community and parents and teachers and clergy can fill that hole."

He offers no alternative. Why would he? That would require a wholesale rethinking of the welfare state and of the perverse incentives that work against the interests of the very people the left claims to care about.

Perverse incentives? Columnist Walter Williams said that census data from 1890 to 1940 show that blacks were slightly more likely than whites to marry, and therefore their children were also more likely to be in a two-parent household. During the Great Depression, "going on the dole" was considered shameful, only done as a dire necessity of last resort after first seeking help from friends, family, churches and charities.

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Larry Elder

Larry Elder is a best-selling author and radio talk-show host. To find out more about Larry Elder, or become an "Elderado," visit www.LarryElder.com.