Kathryn Lopez
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We usually assist in Africa and other impoverished areas around the world, just like Red Cross does, said Sgt. Angelo A. Sedacca of the NYPD, talking about his work with the Knights of Malta, a Catholic charitable organization in more 120 countries throughout the world. Now we're needed here in New York City in the aftermath of Sandy, he told the Catholic News Service.

If you happened to have a roof over your head and electricity in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, and could hear above the political noise over whether or not New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie helped President Obama's chances in next week's election, you were able to see the beauty of civil society in action.

Essential to the story of the preparation, rescue and recovery were men and women who work for the government --elected officials and bureaucrats as well as first responders on the ground. But they couldn't do their job without the existence of a support system of people who live to serve their fellows.

As happened in the wake of the terrorist attack on New York in 2001, the mayor's office in New York immediately pointed to the leading role of the faith-based Salvation Army in providing relief. And there was the member of St. Augustine's Catholic Church in Westchester County, organizing other parishioners in going door-to-door to check up on their neighbors and the elderly in the town making sure they have everything they need,& as the executive director of Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York told the story.

Our hearts are broken when you see the loss of life, the grieving families, the devastation, the ruination, people without their cherished possessions and their homes, Cardinal Timothy Dolan, the archbishop of New York, observed in a television interview. But throughout all of it too, you begin to see a glimmer of light and hope. ... Once again, the best, the most noble sentiments of people are coming out as people are heroic and generous in serving those in need.

This notion of solidarity is one that has been dancing on the margins of presidential politics and public policy all year. Vice-presidential candidate Rep. Paul Ryan once sought Dolan's spiritual guidance on federal policymaking when wrangling with the federal budget.

Faith is indispensible. It's why the increasingly narrow view of religious freedom that the Obama administration harbors is an issue of historic import. Even some of the president's own appointees on the Supreme Court have indicated that it's a step too far, slapping down an administration rule regarding hiring practices at an Evangelical Lutheran school.

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Kathryn Lopez

Kathryn Jean Lopez, editor of National Review Online, writes a weekly column of conservative political and social commentary for Newspaper Enterprise Association.