Jonah Goldberg

Ever since Mitt Romney lost the presidential election, there's been a lot of talk about how the Republican Party needs to "rebrand" itself.

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal wants, among other things, for the GOP to stop being "the stupid party." Rep. Paul Ryan has concluded that the watchword for the Republican Party needs to be "prudence." Sen. Marco Rubio is the front man for the most tangible aspect of the rebranding effort: getting on the right side of the immigration issue. In the process, he's become something of the de facto point person for the party.

The latest entrant into this effort: House Majority leader Eric Cantor. On Tuesday, Cantor gave a well-received speech at the American Enterprise Institute (where I am a fellow), titled "Making Life Work." In it, Cantor argued for utterly reasonable conservative solutions that would improve the plight of the working poor and the middle class.

It's all good stuff from a great field. Indeed, while calling them the "fantastic four" might seem hyperbolic -- and unfair to a few other politicians left out of the mix -- Rubio, Ryan, Jindal and Cantor are a pretty good counterargument to those who think the Republican Party is doomed. Excellent politicians all, three out of four are minorities: a Hispanic, an Indian-American, and a Jew -- which sounds like they should be walking into a bar for a joke. The fourth, the Catholic Ryan, routinely wins a working-class district that votes Democratic in presidential elections.

I should note that lately I've written favorably about this rebranding stuff as well. In a nutshell, I've been arguing that the GOP's problems don't stem from a lack of principle, but from a lack of persuasiveness.

My point was not -- and is not -- that the GOP should abandon its commitment to core conservative principles. If you can't get the swing voters to vote for the existing level of conservatism the GOP is offering, it seems odd to argue that the GOP needs to peddle an even more strident form of conservatism (even if that purer conservatism would yield better policies). If a potential customer says, "The Chevy Impala is too pricey," a good salesman doesn't immediately respond, "OK, can I interest you in a Bentley?"

All that said, I think the push to rebrand the GOP has its own pitfalls.

For starters, "prudence" and "don't be stupid," while excellent prescriptions for how to behave, are not, in themselves, great rallying cries. If you don't believe me, try to get a crowd of the faithful to start chanting "Pru-dence! Pru-dence!" or "We're Not Stupid! We're Not Stupid!"


Jonah Goldberg

Jonah Goldberg is editor-at-large of National Review Online,and the author of the book The Tyranny of Clichés. You can reach him via Twitter @JonahNRO.
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