John Hawkins

1) I'm a pragmatist: At its heart, isn't politics supposed to be about making life better for people? If an education program sounds good, but doesn't help kids learn, what good is it? No matter how good an economic policy sounds today, if it turns your city into Detroit over the long-term, what good is it? If your stimulus program just adds to the deficit and doesn't actually "stimulate" the economy, what good is it? Unfortunately, a lot of liberals seem to choose what policies to support based on whether they make them feel nice or mean, instead of whether they work. That's a short-sighted, destructive way to govern and as a conservative, it's not something I could ever support.

2) I believe every human being has great potential: Not everybody can be Einstein, Steve Jobs, or Babe Ruth, but everybody can be good at something. A person can be a good parent, a good volunteer, the best cashier in the store -- people can do something they can take pride in. This matters a great deal because as Abraham Maslow said, "If you plan on being anything less than you are capable of being, you will probably be unhappy all the days of your life." Encouraging other human beings to be their best matters not just on the human level, but as a society. Conservatives believe that everyone, no matter what his race, gender, sex or religion, has that potential to be something special.

On the other hand, the essence of liberalism is encouraging people to fail, both because failures are more likely to vote Democratic and because it makes liberals feel better to tell other people how to live their lives. So much of modern liberalism is oriented around teaching people to see themselves as victims, to be dependent on government and to nurse a sense of grievance against the rest of society. You don't become a champion on welfare. If you're waiting for the government to solve your problems, you're going to be waiting a long time. Happy, successful people don't ramble on about imaginary "micro aggressions," "white privilege," and "being held down by the patriarchy." Independence, self-reliance and seeing the government as an obstacle, not a sugar daddy are the first steps towards being all you can be in America.


John Hawkins

John Hawkins runs Right Wing News and Linkiest. He's also the co-owner of the The Looking Spoon. You can see more from John Hawkins on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, G+, You Tube, and at PJ Media.