Humberto Fontova

This week the FBI announced a $1 million reward for "information leading to the apprehension" of Joanne Chesimard also known as Assata Shakur who they named a "Most Wanted Terrorist." Chesimard is the first woman to make the FBI’s list. The New Jersey State Police Dept., who also wants her, added another $1 million to the pot.

Convicted cop-killer (of a New Jersey State-Trooper) and "domestic terrorist" Chesimard has been living in Cuba since 1984 as a Castro-coddled celebrity of sorts. And it’s not like bounty hunters can operate freely in a Stalinist country. So the $2 million may be symbolic. As in the U.S. Justice dept. putting on a game face and saying: "Look Castro, we’re serious here!"

In the early 1970’s Chesimard belonged to a Black Panther offshoot known as the Black Liberation Army. "This case is just as important today as it was when it happened 40 years ago," according to a recent press release from Mike Rinaldi, of the New Jersey State Police. "Chesimard was a member of the Black Liberation Army, a "radical left wing terror group that felt justified killing law enforcement officers...This group conducted assaults on police stations and murdered police officers."

More than a mere member of these domestic terrorists, Chesimard was described by former assistant FBI director John Miller, as "the soul of the Black Liberation Army."

In 1973, while wanted for multiple crimes from bank robbery to murder, Chesimard and two accomplices were pulled over for a tail-light violation on the New Jersey Turnpike. As the troopers were routinely questioning them, Chesimard in the passenger seat, and her pals opened up on the lawmen with semi-auto pistols (no word on whether these were properly registered.)

As trooper Werner Foerster grappled with the driver, Chesimard shot him twice--then her gun apparently jammed. As lay Foerster lay on the ground wounded and helpless, Chesimard grabbed the troopers own gun and blasted two shots into his head, much in the manner of her Cuban idols Che Guevara and Raul Castro murdering hundreds of their own (always defenseless at the time) "counter-revolutionary" enemies.

"This crime was always considered an act of domestic terrorism," stresses Mike Rinaldi.

She escaped but was captured in 1977, convicted of murder and sentenced to life plus 33 years. Then in 1979 she escaped from prison--with some ultra-professional help, probably by Cuban or Cuban-trained terrorists. "Two men smuggled into the prison, took guards hostages and broke her out," explained John Miller to CBS News.


Humberto Fontova

Humberto Fontova holds an M.A. in Latin American Studies from Tulane University and is the author of four books including his latest, The Longest Romance; The Mainstream Media and Fidel Castro. For more information and for video clips of his Television and college speaking appearances please visit www.hfontova.com.