Diana West

This week, a bombshell wrapped in an SOS landed on the desk of the inspector general at the Pentagon.

The SOS was a legal complaint from attorney Mark L. Waple. It called for an investigation into whether the Marine Corps was attempting to drive Waple's client, Marine Corps Maj. Fred C. Galvin, from the service through what is known as a "board of inquiry" in retribution for Galvin's legally protected communications with Congress regarding an incident last year in Afghanistan. Such a reprisal, Waple charges, would violate the Military Whistleblower Protection Act.

Even as I was preparing to file this column, the board of inquiry concluded there was no cause to force Galvin, whose 24-year career includes a Bronze Star and five combat tours in Iraq and Afghanistan, from the Marine Corps.

But that still leaves the bombshell.

I'm referring to the letters, sworn statements, reports, even a certified polygraph test result, that sit inside the complaint still at the Pentagon. The documents attest to the incident Galvin witnessed and communicated to members of Congress, among them Republican Reps. Walter Jones of North Carolina and Allen West of Florida.

Here's the short version: One day last June in Sangin, where Galvin was serving as operations officer of the 3rd Reconnaissance Battalion, a request for supporting fire came in from Marines in B Company. On patrol in enemy-controlled territory, a group of these Marines had become "enveloped" in a complex ambush by 30 to 40 enemy soldiers. Soon the enemy was firing from an array of positions -- rocket-propelled grenades, machine guns, AK-47s -- some as close as 34 meters from the Marines, a distance not much longer than a basketball court. The company commander requested supporting fire.

Fifty minutes passed before the battalion commander, Lt. Col. Travis Homiak, complied with the request. Were civilians in the area? No. Further discussion turned on whether to use small, precision munitions, such as a Hellfire laser-guided missile with a 10-pound shape charge -- Galvin's strong recommendation -- or to use something much larger, which, in Homiak's stated opinion, would drive away enemy forces. With Marines well within "danger close" proximity to enemy forces, Galvin, a former Marine instructor in fire support for raids and reconnaissance, was concerned that the probability of injury or even fratricide from a large bomb was too high.


Diana West

Diana West is the author of American Betrayal: The Secret Assault on Our Nation's Character (St. Martin's Press, 2013), and The Death of the Grown-Up: How America's Arrested Development Is Bringing Down Western Civilization (St. Martin's Press, 2007).