Derek Hunter

You have to give progressives credit. They’re nothing if not thorough. When an opportunity to limit the Second Amendment presented itself in the Sandy Hook massacre, regardless how tasteless it was to exploit that opportunity, they went full bore toward their goal.

Sen. Diane Feinstein, D-Calif., introduced sweeping so-called “assault weapons” ban legislation this week that would place unprecedented restrictions on individuals’ rights to own, use, sell and even pass along already owned firearms to family members. But given where things stand now in the polls and political atmosphere, that legislation will go nowhere.

But the Constitution and the will of the people matter little to a progressive with an opportunity.

If they were at all interested in the democracy they routinely claim to champion, they would accept the will of voters and engage in an effort to change minds and the Constitution to reflect their wishes. But much like a three-card Monte street hustler, they pursue the debate over this proposed legislation merely to draw our attention away from what they really seek to do.

While the media focused on Sen. Feinstein’s legislation and President Obama’s dog-and-pony show – complete with children for props and “executive initiatives” that amount to no more than a to-do list for himself –, the real progressive attack on the Second Amendment churns on beneath the radar.

Progressive politicians across the country are attempting to launch a stealth war against gun manufacturers, trying to harm them financially because they can’t legislatively.

Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter has the city moving to divest its pension fund from weapons and ammunitions companies in an attempt to pressure them to agree to more controls on their businesses. But Nutter isn’t alone, a growing list of progressive politicians from across the country are using their workers’ pensions, their retirement savings, like chips in a game of high-stakes poker.

By pulling, or threatening to pull, hundreds of millions of dollars in investments from manufacturers, it threatens to take stock prices artificially low. They’re willing to play politics with the retirement of their workers in order to advance their agenda. But the full-frontal assault on their stock price isn’t the only stealth avenue they’re seeking.

Chicago’s Rahm Emanuel, mayor of the murder capital of the world, is taking a second line of attack by putting pressure on banks to stop their financial involvement with weapons manufactures until they capitulate to the progressive will.

Emanuel, the president’s former chief of staff, wouldn’t dare make such a move if he didn’t have the blessing of the White House.


Derek Hunter

Derek Hunter is Washington, DC based writer, radio host and political strategist. You can also stalk his thoughts 140 characters at a time on Twitter.