Dennis Prager

The title of this column seems unbelievable, but it is in fact what happened in America this past week. And almost no one has noticed.

After 50 years of being inundated with stories of white racism, and being taught in college that in this white-dominated society, only a white can be a racist, the American public has been properly brainwashed into accepting the otherwise incredible: A black man murdered eight white people at his place of work because they were white, and the media story is about the murderer's alleged experiences of racism.

Here's the Associated Press Report from Aug. 7, four days after the murders. It was reprinted in The Washington Post and throughout America:

"To those closest to him, Omar Thornton was caring, quiet and soft-spoken ... But underneath, Thornton seethed with a sense of racial injustice for years that culminated in a shooting rampage Tuesday in which the Connecticut man killed eight and wounded two others at his job at Hartford Distributors in Manchester before killing himself.

"'I know what pushed him over the edge was all the racial stuff that was happening at work,' said his girlfriend, Kristi Hannah.

"'He always felt like he was being discriminated (against) because he was black,' said Jessica Anne Brocuglio, his former girlfriend. 'Basically they wouldn't give him pay raises. He never felt like they accepted him as a hard working person.'

"'Thornton changed jobs a few times because he was not getting raises, Brocuglio said."

The New York Times Aug. 3 headline read: "Troubles Preceded Connecticut Workplace Killing," and in the second paragraph, the Times reported:

"He might also have had cause to be angry: he had complained to his girlfriend of being racially harassed at work, the woman's mother said, and lamented that his grievances had gone unaddressed."

On Aug. 7, 2010, The Washington Post headline read, "Beer warehouse shooter long complained of racism."

Of course, Thornton was fired for stealing beer, and there was video proof of him doing so. But this fact -- the one indisputable and most pertinent pre-murder fact -- got lost within the larger context of Thornton's claims of being a victim of whites.


Dennis Prager

Dennis Prager is a SRN radio show host, contributing columnist for Townhall.com and author of his newest book, Still the Best Hope: Why the World Needs American Values to Triumph.
 
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