David Limbaugh
I don't think Congress should begin impeachment proceedings against President Obama right now, but I also don't think that considering the idea is "crazy talk."

The man has, in my view and that of many others, committed multitudinous impeachable offenses, and we need to strenuously object and bring it to the public's attention every chance we get. The idea of turning our heads and looking the other way is repugnant.

Yes, the elections are too close for Republicans to risk impeachment proceedings at this point, unless it became clear that the majority of Americans have the political will for that action -- as Andy McCarthy eloquently explains in his book "Faithless Execution."

But my concern is that many of those who are so dismissive of impeachment are the same ones who always argue caution in opposing Obama. They tend to throw in the towel before the fights even begin, scared of their shadow and forever banking on that next election.

Though it may not be the opportune time for impeachment, I am very concerned about what Obama's unchecked usurpations of power have done to the balance of power in the federal government and the overall integrity of the Constitution and the rule of law. Seeing as we have not taken any formal action against this president for his egregious transgressions, what will the next president be allowed to do on his own should he choose to operate outside his authority to the same extent Obama has?

But to me, impeachment really isn't the issue when it comes to the various factions within the Republican Party and the conservative movement. I have long contended that the differences between tea party conservatives and the so-called establishment are far deeper than "tactics"; they also involve policy disagreements.

On that point, let me ask you to consider what will happen if Republicans do end up with control of both the House and the Senate. What will the prudent and cautious advocate then? Will they say not to oppose Obama too much for fear that he'd successfully demonize Republicans as partisan saboteurs and ensure the election of a Democrat as president in 2016?

Let's go further. Let's say Republicans then win the presidency and retain control of Congress in 2016. Then what?

I would wager that many of my establishment friends will continue to advise restraint, urging us not to drastically roll back Obama's liberal policies, either because they'll be horrified about the next election or because they have really, in the end, lost their stomach for political battle and their taste for free market principles.


David Limbaugh

David Limbaugh, brother of radio talk-show host Rush Limbaugh, is an expert in law and politics and author of new book Crimes Against Liberty, the definitive chronicle of Barack Obama's devastating term in office so far.

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