Brian Darling
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Why do people run for office? Too many, it seems, do it for the sheer joy of throwing their weight—and other people’s money—around. Thus we have, at the local level, the sorry spectacle of tin pot politicians—apparently offended at the idea of traditional marriage—threatening to ban Chick-fil-A restaurant openings. At the federal level, we have politicians, oblivious to our $16 trillion debt—intent on funneling even more taxpayer money to agricultural conglomerates and food-stamp recipients.

Chick-fil-A has run afoul of PC lefties for the high crime of having a founder and CEO who (gasp) celebrates traditional marriage. Calls for boycotts, kiss-ins, and denials of business licenses ensued. Get a grip, people.

Supporters of traditional marriage don’t try to run companies out of town if their leaders happen to support gay marriage—even when that support is massive and calculated to influence public policy. Policymic.com lists 11 prominent CEOs who have gone out of their way to back gay marriage. Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, for example, has donated $2.5 million to convince voters in Washington State to just say “yes” to a same-sex marriage referendum this fall. Despite Bezos’ millions, the referendum is expected to fail. Yet neither Bezos nor his company has been subjected to vicious attacks from conservatives. That level of hatred is reserved for religious types who dare to say they support traditional marriage.

Microsoft’s CEO Steve Ballmer and Bill Gates have donated money to the same cause as Bezos. When Starbucks Executive Vice President Kalen Holmes vociferously backed the Washington referendum measure, conservatives registered their displeasure by handing out a few “Dump Starbucks” bumper stickers. End of story.

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Brian Darling

Brian Darling is a Senior Fellow in Government Studies at the Heritage Foundation. Follow him on Twitter @BrianHDarling