Ann Coulter
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Perhaps instead of taking potshots at me in its Book Review section, The New York Times could consider reviewing one of my books. With only one review -- not in the Book Review -- after eight New York Times best-sellers, the editors can rest assured that I know they don't like me.

Reviewing a book about the 1989 rape of the Central Park jogger last week, the reviewer sniped that "coarser pundits like Ann Coulter continue to exploit the case whenever possible."

My chapter on the Central Park rape in my recently released, smash New York Times best-seller, "Demonic: How the Liberal Mob Is Endangering America," evidently "exploits" the case by citing facts. Based on those facts, I argue that the real trials reached more believable verdicts than the show trial held by the Left 13 years later.

On April 19, 1989, a 28-year-old investment banker went for a run through Central Park, whereupon she was attacked by a violent mob, savagely beaten, raped and left for dead. By the time the police found her at 1:30 a.m. that night, she was beaten so badly, she had lost three-fourths of her blood and the police couldn't tell if she was male or female. The homicide unit of the Manhattan D.A.'s office initially took the case because not one of her doctors believed she would be alive in the morning.

Confessions were obtained in accordance with the law, with the defendants' parents present at all police interrogations. All but one of the confessions was videotaped. After a six-week hearing solely on the admissibility of the confessions, a judge ruled them lawful.

At the trials, evidence was ruled on by the judge and tested in court. Witnesses were presented for both sides and subjected to cross-examination.

One witness, for example, an acquaintance of one of the defendants, testified that when she talked to him in jail after the arrests, he told her that he hadn't raped the jogger, he "only held her legs down while (another defendant) f--ked her." (That's enough for a rape conviction.)

In the opposite of a "rush to judgment," two multi-ethnic juries deliberated for 10 days and 11 days, respectively, before unanimously finding the defendants guilty of most crimes charged -- though innocent of others. The convictions were later upheld on appeal.

The only way liberals could get those convictions overturned was to change venues from a courtroom to a newsroom. So that's what they did.

The convictions were vacated based not on a new trial or on new evidence, but solely on the "confession" of Matias Reyes.

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