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Tipsheet

Joe Biden's White House Is at It Again With So-Called Unity Message

AP Photo/Evan Vucci

In light of the recent Christmas holiday and now upcoming new year, President Joe Biden appears to really be doubling down on what he no doubts is banking on will be a happy and hopeful message. That is to say he's hoping Americans will really actually believe this time he's all about that unity he promised on the campaign trail.

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As the Wednesday night tweet claims, Biden was actually successful in that promise "to bring the country together," as he's "achieved one of the most successful bipartisan records in recent American history."

When it comes to the bipartisan bills that Biden has signed as president, it's important to look through it in the context of how Congress is pretty evenly split right now. The Democrats have had the most narrow majority possible in the Senate during Biden's presidency so far, and their majority in the House isn't that much bigger. All it takes is a handful of moderate Republicans or some RINO members to work together with Democrats. 

Further, Biden also signed at least two major pieces of legislation during his presidency that passed with no support from Republicans, the American Rescue Plan Act in March of last year, which one House Democrat, Rep. Jared Golden of Maine voted against, and the so-called but woefully misnamed Inflation Reduction Act in August. 

Even if one were to use that as a measure of success, it's hard to directly relate that to Biden actually "bring[ing] the country together." 

While Biden claimed to run for president in 2020 to unite the country, something he doubled down on at his inauguration, that didn't turn out to be the case. Almost from the start polls showed that the American people doubted his ability to "bring the country closer together."

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How voters feel about the job performance of Biden, as well as the direction of the country, has been particularly poor. Leading into this year that is soon to be over, Biden experienced the sharpest drop in popularity in the shortest time. "No other president has fallen that far that fast," Marc Thiessen told Fox News almost a year ago today. 

Those metrics should have been mattered more in the midterms, but for whatever reason they didn't. House Republicans will begin the 118th Congress next week with a slim majority of their own. 

Let's not forget how Biden demonized his political opponents as "MAGA Republicans" and claimed that they "represent an extremism that threatens the very foundation of our republic," a tactic he tried to walk back but nevertheless he, his administration, and fellow Democrats kept going back to. As much as he detested the tactic, former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich (R-GA) told Fox News the morning after the election that it may have contributed to why Democrats performed better than expected. 

Nevertheless, slim though it may be, Republicans still at least control one chamber. They may not have too much of a mandate, but the Democrats certainly don't have one. And Biden did not "bring the country together," unless one counts how bitterly divided Americans are, other than to oppose his policies.

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In just a matter of hours, the tweet received over 2,600 replies, and over 180 quoted retweets, with many calling out the White House's tweet for its lies. 

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