'Let Them Die': Local NAACP Leader Espouses Violent Rhetoric Against Opponents of Critical Race Theory

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Posted: Jul 15, 2021 10:00 PM
'Let Them Die': Local NAACP Leader Espouses Violent Rhetoric Against Opponents of Critical Race Theory

Source: AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File

Michelle Leete, leader of the NAACP Fairfax chapter, had some choice words for those who dare oppose Critical Race Theory (CRT). "Let them die," she proclaimed to applause from a crowd who joined her outside Jackson Middle School, located in the Fairfax County Public School (FCPS) system, the 11th largest in the country and the largest in Virginia. The protest came before a school board meeting that night. 

Such an incendiary line came after Leete ranted off a whole slew of names to refer to those in opposition to CRT, including "anti-education, anti-teacher, anti-equity, anti-history, anti-racial reckoning, anti-opportunity, anti-help people, anti-diversity, anti-platform, anti-science, anti-change agent, anti-social justice, anti-health care (mentioned twice), anti-worker (mentioned twice), anti-LGBTQ+, anti-children, anti-environment, anti-admissions policy change, anti-inclusion, anti-live and let live people." 

"Let them die," she continued to applause, before going on to urge the crowd, "don't let these uncomfortable people deter us from our own march forward." 

The topic of CRT is one that has taken center stage nationally, with members of Congress introducing federal legislation to ban CRT. It's becoming rather explosive at the local level, too. 

In May, Townhall spoke with parents whose children are enrolled in FCPS about a survey they were invited to take concerning "Revisions of the Controversial Issues Policy & Development of a new Anti-Racism, Anti-Bias Education Curriculum Policy."

Almost all who spoke with Townhall were opposed to such revised policies and many referenced CRT. 

The situation surrounding CRT has gotten out of control elsewhere in northern Virginia. As Matt reported last month, a school board meeting led to an arrest after the meeting was declared an unlawful assembly. 

It's also having an effect on the state's gubernatorial race. Virginia is just one of two states to have an off-year statewide election, the other being New Jersey. The Republican nominee, Glenn Youngkin, has made it a campaign promise to outlaw CRT, a promise he's repeating on the campaign trail. On June 30, Youngkin held a rally outside the Loudoun Public Schools Administration Building. 

According to last month's map from NBC, 22 states have introduced or signed into law legislation that bans CRT. Arizona's Gov. Doug Ducey (R) signed such legislation into law last week. 

The Republican Party of Virginia quickly flagged the exchange, and in a tweet of its own, tied it to Democratic nominee Terry McAuliffe. He referred to CRT as "another right-wing conspiracy" that was "totally made up by Donald Trump and Glenn Youngkin." 

Critical Race Theory is not the only controversial issue that has been discussed at school board meetings. Transgender school policies have also come up. 

Townhall has been following the story of Tanner Cross, an elementary school teacher in Loudoun County who was placed on leave and may ultimately be fired for speaking out against a policy that will refer to students by their preferred pronouns. The latest update is that after a Circuit Court ruled the school's actions were likely unconstitutional, the district has appealed that ruling to the Virginia Supreme Court.

During Thursday's meeting, Jackson Middle School Member-at-Large Abrar Omeish spoke out against "malicious deadnaming" and "malicious misgendering." 

As Townhall reported, Omeish is a member who used her public Facebook page to make an anti-Israel Eid Mubarak post on May 13. "Hurts my heart to celebrate while Israel kills Palestinians & desecrates the Holy Land right now," her post read in part. 

Also on Thursday, Carson provided a write-up of the "Madness in Minnesota" regarding a Tuesday school board meeting in the town of Rochester. Critical Race Theory was a topic raised by parents, as were mask mandates.