With that Preliminary Study, It Looks Like the Liberal Media Can Stop Being COVID Nazis at Football Games

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Posted: Feb 20, 2021 11:45 PM
With that Preliminary Study, It Looks Like the Liberal Media Can Stop Being COVID Nazis at Football Games

Source: AP Photo/The Tuscaloosa News, Robert Sutton

Okay, liberal media, you can stop being the COVID Gestapo at sporting events, specifically football. Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Tom Brady was "Karen’d" by the media for not wearing a mask as he walked into the locker room for Super Bowl 55. No one cares. You can’t cancel Tom Brady. He’s now a seven-time Super Bowl champion. Shut up. It also helps that none of the media members whining know or watch football, so their commentary often is an exercise in how one can get way ahead of their skis. 

How many times have you seen the posts on Twitter and social media about who is and who is not wearing a mask at football games, both college and professional? That’s certainly more important than—say—the staff of a New York liberal governor admitting to covering up the real COVID death toll to supposedly avoid a federal investigation. Translation: we did it to make ourselves look better.

Well, circling back to this virus and sports, it looks like a preliminary report shows that fans in the stands for college and NFL football games did not contribute to COVID spread. This isn’t peer-reviewed yet and it should not be taken as established fact, but it’s some early reading of the tea leaves here (via Outkick) [bold text indicates study’s print]:

For all of us in favor of fan attendance at sporting events, we got some great news on Saturday. A recent study published on medRxiv found that having fans in the stands for NFL and college football games did not increase the spread of COVID-19.

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The purpose of the study was to identify whether or not the limited in-person attendance had any effect on the number of COVID cases. Below is a snippet from the results of the study, filed under the “conclusions and relevance” section:

This time-series, cross-sectional matching study with a difference-in-differences design did not find an increase in COVID-19 cases per 100,000 residents in the counties where NFL and NCAA games were held with in-person attendance. Our study suggests that NFL and NCAA football games hosted with limited in-person attendance do not cause a significant increase in local COVID-19 cases.

Granted, we have to remember that this is based on the limited in-person attendance allowed at those varying games. But this is certainly a good sign.

Yes, indeed. Fingers crossed.