On Last Night of DNC, Dems Didn't Duplicate Virtual Audience...But What They Did Might Be Worse

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Posted: Aug 21, 2020 6:00 AM
On Last Night of DNC, Dems Didn't Duplicate Virtual Audience...But What They Did Might Be Worse

Source: AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

The show is over. The Democratic National Convention is over. Former Vice President Joe Biden is the 2020 Democratic nominee—and he didn’t forget where he was this time. He read from a teleprompter. The bar was low. It’s going to be a whole different ballgame when he’s one-on-one with Trump. We were blessed that this spectacle was only aired for two hours this week. I don’t think I could’ve handled lengthy speeches from these Trump-deranged clowns.  

With COVID forcing all the conventions to go virtual, the “audience” in the background experienced some odd occurrences. Last night, California Sen. Kamala Harris accepted the nomination for vice president and Democrats struggle to find 30 people to fill that virtual audience board. So, they copy and pasted duplicates to fill it up. It did not go unnoticed. Last night, they decided not to do that, but instead leave spaces blank. Now that was extremely noticeable. 

Look, there is no win-win here. Duplicates look bad. Empty spaces look bad. The truth of the matter is that it reflects how Democrats feel about Joe Biden. He’s unimpressive. He’s just…there. The enthusiasm gap was evident throughout this whole production. A lot of hot air was blown to inflate Joe Biden as some top-notch Democrat. He’s not. He never has been. The only thing remarkable about Joe is that he got elected a bunch of times and did nothing. He latched onto Barack Obama in 2008 and was part of a winning presidential endeavor, but we all know Democrats were voting for the top of the ticket. Joe ran twice and both times ended in disaster. They were unremarkable pushes. He’s the nominee now because, after multiple debates among a sea of no-names, Joe just seemed to be one with the most name recognition who could possibly beat Trump. It took the party base a while to warm up to that fact, begrudgingly so. No one wanted Joe to be the 2020 nominee. The base is more left-wing. Joe is not, though he’s been forced to adopt a Sander-esque platform. Joe got lucky. He’s just the ‘guy who was there’ when the race looked like he alone stood the best candidate to win. That’s far from a full-throated endorsement from the party base or his fellow Democrats. They’d rather not watch—represented in those empty boxes on the screen last night.