Boot Camp: The Hoover Institution Is Taking America's College Kids to a Different Kind Of School

Matt Vespa
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Posted: Aug 22, 2017 7:00 AM
Boot Camp: The Hoover Institution Is Taking America's College Kids to a Different Kind Of School

No, it’s nothing like Full Metal Jacket. There’s no Gomer Pyle. Private Joker doesn’t exist—and R. Lee. Ermey isn’t getting in your grill. Still, the Hoover Institution is hosting a public policy boot camp for undergraduates and recent graduates from across the nation from August 20-26, where some of the best in this field are giving lectures from their respective fields on national security, economics, and law. Senior fellows at the Institution, Scott Atlas and Joshua Rauh, organized the event. 

It’s a jam-packed agenda, with John Yoo, who served as Deputy U.S. Attorney General for the Office of Legal Counsel, delivering a keynote dinner address on the August 21. Niall Ferguson, a renowned economist who is also known for his works “Empire: How Britain Made The Modern World” and “The Ascent of Money,” is also slated to deliver a keynote during the program’s lunch hour. Ferguson also delved into 20th Century conflicts for his book “The War of the World.” John Taylor, the inventor of the Taylor Rule in central banking, and Ed Lazear, a former White House economist under the George W. Bush administration, will also be giving lectures. 

Two former members of the State Department Kori Schake and Stephen Krasner will be discussing American Security under the Trump presidency as well. Schake was a foreign policy adviser to the McCain-Palin campaign. She also served on the National Security Council and the Office of the Secretary and Joints Chiefs of Staff at the Department of Defense. Mr. Krasner was the director of policy planning under Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice. He also served on the National Security Council. 

The agenda and lectures over the course of the week are also quite intense. Students will be learning the following subjects. The goal is to make students think critically about public policy using facts and data. 

1. Monetary Policy

2. The world economy

3. Environmental Markets through the lens of property rights

4. Banking regulations

5. Constitutional foundations

6. State budgets

7. The U.S. Constitution and the Supreme Court

8. The state of national security under the Trump presidency.

9. The importance of intellectual property rights and how its key to expanding economic growth.

It looks like Hoover didn’t leave any stone unturned concerning public policy. Then again, that's in keeping with the institution's mission statement, as stated by its founder, former President Herbet Hoover:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

[Senior Fellows Scott Atlas, right, and Joshua Rauh, left]

 Get to work, folks!