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The Topic Discussed at Biden's 'Undisclosed' Meeting with Historians

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Posted: Mar 24, 2021 1:30 PM
The Topic Discussed at Biden's 'Undisclosed' Meeting with Historians

Source: Official White House Photo by Adam Schultz

If Americans thought former President Obama fundamentally transformed the country, President Biden is taking things to a whole new level—whether it’s on the administration’s approach to immigration, which will soon touch all corners of the U.S., to gun control, election “reform,” the Green New Deal, and more. But how much will he be able to get done in two years before the midterm elections?

According to an Axios report, Biden held an “undisclosed meeting” with historians recently to talk about his future plans, which “included discussion of how big is too big — and how fast is too fast — to jam through once-in-a-lifetime historic changes to America.”

Not surprisingly, the historians present “were very much in sync with his own” views. And to the detriment of the country, the consensus was that “it is time to go even bigger and faster than anyone expected,” Axios reports, even if that means axing the filibuster and forgoing bipartisanship.

Four things are pushing Biden to jam through what could amount to a $5 trillion-plus overhaul of America, and vast changes to voting, immigration and inequality.

  1. He has full party control of Congress, and a short window to go big.
  2. He has party activists egging him on.
  3. He has strong gathering economic winds at his back.
  4. And he’s popular in polls. […]

People close to Biden tell us he’s feeling bullish on what he can accomplish, and is fully prepared to support the dashing of the Senate’s filibuster rule to allow Democrats to pass voting rights and other trophy legislation for his party. (Axios)

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell has warned if Democrats get rid of the filibuster, "the Senate is lost."

“It may not be the panacea that they anticipate it would be, it could turn the Senate into sort of a nuclear winter, where the aftermath of the so-called nuclear option is not a sustainable place,” he said in a recent podcast interview.