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Tipsheet

Romney Squeaks Out a Win in Ohio

Ohio is unquestionably the most symbolic win of Super Tuesday. It's a microcosm of America situated in the heart of the Rust Belt, a major swing state and more importantly, no Republican nominee has ever taken the White House without winning the state. Romney’s win here solidifies his case that he is the best frontrunner to take on Obama.
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Although Santorum had been ahead in Ohio polls since the beginning of February, Romney surged in the days leading up to Super Tuesday. His superior spending capabilities and organizational strength in the Buckeye state undoubtedly played a big role but Romney’s major selling point – his life in the private sector – also clearly resonated with Ohioans who are first and foremost concerned with the economy. Plus, it proves that he can win over working-class voters.

Sixty three of Ohio’s 66 delegates are up for grabs tonight, with three delegates awarded for each congressional district won – totaling 48. Santorum's delegate problem means that as many as 18 delegates could be off limit to him. If he does win those districts, however, the unallocated delegates will not be awarded to anyone else at this time. The remaining 15 delegates will be awarded proportionally based on a candidate's performance statewide as long as they earn 20 percent of the popular vote.

More to come..

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