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Tipsheet

Rep. Maloney: Republicans Would Reject Cancer Cure

On top of being terrorists and hostage takers, Democrat Rep. Carolyn Maloney apparently thinks Republicans hate cancer patients  because they wouldn't budge on tax hikes during the debt debate.

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"If President Obama came in with a cure for cancer they would have turned that down, too," she said.

FLASHBACK: Rationing for cancer patients begins through ObamaCare.

A decision to rescind endorsement of the drug would reignite the highly charged debate over US health care reform and how much the state should spend on new and expensive treatments.

Avastin, the world’s best selling cancer drug, is primarily used to treat colon cancer and was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2008 for use on women with breast cancer that has spread.

It costs $8,000 (£5,000) a month and is given to about 17,500 women in the US a year. The drug was initially approved after a study found that, by preventing blood flow to tumours, it extended the amount of time until the disease worsened by more than five months. However, two new studies have shown that the drug may not even extend life by an extra month.

The FDA advisory panel has now voted 12-1 to drop the endorsement for breast cancer treatment. The panel unusually cited "effectiveness" grounds for the decision. But it has been claimed that "cost effectiveness" was the real reason ahead of reforms in which the government will extend health insurance to the poorest.

 

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