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Tipsheet

Polyamory: A Choice. Homosexuality: Not a Choice

That's a main push of Jessica Bennet's latest piece on Newsweek -- Polyamory: The Next Sexual Revolution? The primary problem, she says, is parenting, which "polys" don't legally have the right to do:
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Anecdotally, research shows that children can do well in poly families—as long as they're in a stable home with loving parents, says Elisabeth Sheff, a sociologist at Georgia State University, who is conducting the first large-scale study of children of poly parents, which has been ongoing for a decade. But because academia is only beginning to study the phenomenon—Sheff's study is too recent to have drawn conclusions about the children's well-being over time—there is little data to support that notion in court.
Oh, and the other issue -- "fighting mother nature":
Polyamory might sound like heaven to some: a variety of partners, adding spice and a respite from the familiarity and boredom that's doomed many a traditional couple. But humans are hard-wired to be jealous, and though it may be possible to overcome it, polyamorous couples are "fighting Mother Nature" when they try, says biological anthropologist Helen Fisher, a professor at Rutgers University who has long studied the chemistry of love.

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