Al Gore: Let's Get Rid Of The Electoral College, But I Have To Say This About Florida

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Posted: Aug 08, 2017 2:00 PM
Al Gore: Let's Get Rid Of The Electoral College, But I Have To Say This About Florida

We should have seen this iceberg coming well in advance, especially on a liberal show like Real Time with Bill Maher. Former Vice President Al Gore ventured onto HBO’s Real Time over the weekend to engage in progressive cuddlefest with host Bill Maher about climate change. It was the usual liberal pow-wow, relating to melting ice sheets, flooding, and other wild weather. Maher noted how the weather could impact Florida, maybe even lose it, quipping that Gore would know a thing or two about losing Florida.

“Actually, I think I carried Florida,” replied Gore to applause from the progressive audience.

The two also discussed how coal isn’t coming back, and how greenies have a responsibility to retrain coal miners, who Gore gives credit for helping build this country, in renewable energy jobs, like wind turbine technicians. Yeah—that’s cute.


We all know liberals despise these people. Hillary Clinton made that well known and they probably feel what they do, mining for coal to provide food for their families, is immoral because, well, that doesn’t fall into their views on how to make an acceptable living. Yet, Maher did ask an interesting question, which is why can’t they sell it, the lucrative renewable energy jobs that are replacing coal? Well, for starters, the whole notion that coal mining is bad work. False, it’s very good work. It’s a source of high-paying employment for those who don’t have the opportunity for a higher education. Law enforcement is another job that affords those without college educations to have a good paying job with benefits. The problem is that the national media and progressives think that cops are killers, picking off people of color in some surreptitious murder campaign that doesn’t exist. And that’s the problem. Rural voters thinks Democrats view them as country bumpkins, simple, racist, and not really part of their vision for the future. As a result, they’re shunned and marginalized. They’re not really worth saving. It’s a feeling that’s deeply entrenched, and Democrats are not doing themselves any favors by trying to rebrand themselves with the tattered remains of Hillary Clinton’s failed 2016 platform.

Yet, it was towards the end of the interview, which lasted almost 12 minutes, that provided more red meat for the progressive left. Maher brought up the 2000 election, where he said Gore “won/lost” the election. Maher noted the pernicious trend of his side winning more votes and the other side still winning the election. Liberals speak of the 2016 and 2000 losses as if they’re common occurrences. They’re not. The 2016 election will be the fifth time in which a candidate won the presidency by winning the Electoral College but losing the popular vote. Again, that’s five times in 241 years. Everyone calm down—and no, the republic is not in peril. Yet, Gore thinks we need to get rid of our centuries-old institution of election the president through either a constitutional amendment or the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact. I’ll have something on that later this week.

So, in all, it was a liberal love fest about global warming, destroying the Electoral College, and showing, once again, how the Left cannot get over the fact that George W. Bush won the election. This sounds oddly familiar, right?

Oh, and as for wacky weather, let’s not forget that we had the calmest hurricane season in three decades a few years ago, the quietest tornado season in six decades, and the Arctic Ice Cap grew by 533,000 square miles when it was supposed to disappear by 2013. In that same year, we saw the creation of 19,000 Manhattan-sized islands of sea ice. These are the same people who said the earth would experience re-glaciation due to cooling temperatures in the 1970s. Excuse me, while I still remain skeptical that we’re on the precipice of Armageddon here. 

The interview began with both of these men talking about the so-called "tipping point" for global warming. There's no consensus on that either.