Clinton Still Wants to Be President

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Posted: Oct 29, 2018 6:15 AM
Clinton Still Wants to Be President

After two unsuccessful runs to become president, Hillary Clinton may believe that the third time is the charm.

Even though she acknowledged that she has no desire to campaign again, Clinton said at New York City's 92nd Street Y on Friday that she’d “like to be president.”

The admission came during a Q&A with Recode’s Kara Swisher:

We’re going to talk about 2020 in a minute. Do you want to run again?

No. No.

That was a pause...

Well I’d like to be president. I think, hopefully, when we have a Democrat in the Oval Office in January of 2021, there’s going to be so much work to be done. I mean we have confused everybody in the world, including ourselves. We have confused our friends and our enemies. They have no idea what the United States stands for, what we’re likely to do, what we think is important, so the work would be work that I feel very well prepared for having been at the Senate for eight years, having been a diplomat in the State department, and it’s just going to be a lot of heavy lifting.

She went on to say that she won’t even begin to think about a possible run until after the midterm elections. 

So are you going to be doing any of that lifting? Do you feel like ...

Oh I have no idea, Kara, but I’m going to ... I’m not even going to even think about it til we get through this November 6 election about what’s going to happen after that, but I’m going to everything in my power to make sure we have a Democrat in the White House come January of 2021.

The comments probably won't come as welcome news to many Democrats, however, who are growing increasingly frustrated with Clinton for continuing to be so visible—and not in a good way. She's made a number of headlines recently for saying her husband’s affair with a 22-year-old intern was not an abuse of power because she was an adult, and that Democrats should not be civil with Republicans. 

Bill and Hillary are also set to kick off a 13-city speaking tour that will include "stories and inspiring anecdotes that shaped their historic careers in public service, while also discussing issues of the day and looking toward the future," explains Live Nation, the tour's organizer.