Buzz Aldrin and the Selfie 200 Miles from Earth

Justin Holcomb
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Posted: Nov 13, 2015 4:30 PM
Buzz Aldrin and the Selfie 200 Miles from Earth

What ever happened to looking up at the night sky? Observing, contemplating, and wondering what lies beyond our small world is something of the past.

This Friday, lets try and ignore all of the turmoil at Missouri, the arguments between Republicans and Democrats, and instead relive some of America’s most outstanding moments.

Yesterday, Buzz Aldrin posted a picture of the first ever ‘selfie’ in space during his Gemini 12 spacewalk. The Air Force Colonel, who shot down two MiG-15s during the Korean War, has served his country his entire lifetime. Known as a cunning warrior in the air, Buzz was selected to join the newly created NASA program in 1963. He went on to be the second human to walk on the moon behind Neil Armstrong.

Buzz reminds us of our past glory days. The times where we did not squander over taxes, politicians, or ‘safe spaces’ are all but gone it seems like. When will the day return where we can put all of those issues behind us and venture out into the universe just as Christopher Columbus ventured into the Atlantic Ocean. When we will we start advancing the human race and continue the tradition that Americans like Buzz Aldrin have set before us?

I had the great experience of meeting Buzz Aldrin at a book signing in Washington, D.C. a few months ago. He was wearing his famous ‘Get Your Ass to Mars’ t-shirt and, might I add, is one 85-year-old who I would think twice about before 'squaring up with'. Being in his presence was almost like reliving a time from the past.  I felt proud.  I felt like I was meeting a hero I had read about in history books. It reminded me of a long lost time where America was leading the rest of the world into the future.

At the same time, I felt embarrassed for myself, and the people of my generation. Here I was, a 25-year-old American man standing in the presence of Buzz Aldrin and he looked at me as if to say, “what is happening with our country?” “Why are young men like you not pushing the limits of science and technology into further galaxies?” I almost felt like I had let him down; like my generation was supposed to carry on the legacy that men like him created for us. However, the only thing that my generation is good for is rallying about ‘safe spaces’ on campus and demanding free college tuition. I am sure that the term ‘safe spaces’ carried an entirely different meaning for the Apollo astronauts, especially when they were soaring through outer space at Mach 32. For just one second, can we ignore all the politics and ask ourselves one question, what are we doing?

Lets get our act together America, lets get our ass to Mars!