What Trump, Sanders—and Many of Us— Have in Common

John P. Warren
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Posted: Aug 23, 2015 12:01 AM
What Trump, Sanders—and Many of Us—  Have in Common

What all of us have in common is both simple and obvious: none of us want Hillary Rodham Clinton to become President of the United States.

Another commonality is that our government is not working the way it ought, and here we part company.

Bernie Sanders and his camp followers do not think the government does enough for them, and he would move heaven and earth to make Uncle Sam butler and sugar daddy to the masses. His website promises everything but jobs, yet he has attracted heavy debtors who want the government to magically waive their troubles away. His scheme is simple, but would not outlast his lifetime: steal from those who have it and give it to many with no interest in earning it.

Thus, Democrats like Sanders, Hillary Clinton, and Elizabeth Warren, would guarantee an equality of outcome, as if my poor writing skills would suddenly be deemed the equal of John Grisham, David McCullough, or Daniel Silva. Should Bernie be able to tax the daylights out of these stellar scribes and give the proceeds of their genius to a scribbler like me? That’s what their scheme always gets down to.

What Donald Trump and many of the rest us can agree about is that the government hasn’t been working for us, either. For the past six plus years in particular we’ve been forced to live in an alternate universe where America is no longer the exceptional nation we believed it to be. A virulent political correctness has reigned, reining in free speech and by extension, free thought and worship. The velocity of wealth redistribution has accelerated with government contractors actively recruiting new members into the benefits class, enticing one an all to grasp for any and many ornaments on the federal, state, and local Christmas trees (damn those “holiday” trees).

We have seen the gates to our beloved country thrown open without a thought to our own personal, economic, or national security. Witness the numberless brutalities committed upon Americans, rich and poor alike, by criminal illegals let loose in our neighborhoods like Great White Sharks freed in community pools. Witness the millions of jobs stolen from Americans by illegals, 40% of whom have no high school diploma and who work for 75% or less of what our people could command without the unfair, illegal competition. Witness the shadowed jihadis who have freely crossed our southern and northern borders with the sole intent to terrorize us.

Worst of all, witness the hundreds of sanctuary cities where, federal law apparently does not “trump” (pun intended) state and local law, where millions of illegals live, work, have children, and take advantage of our largesse. In 2014, California issued over 800,000 driver’s licenses, half of which went to illegals. Of the 113 Billion dollars this nation spends each year to support a population of at least 12 million illegals, only 13 Billion comes back to us in taxes. The rest is on our credit card, which means we borrow from China to support this nonsensical approach to our national integrity.

What is also upside down is the so-called Iran “deal,” a scam by its true name. 

So there’s much to arouse strong passions. People say, “We’re not angry! We’re frustrated.” Either way, who can blame them?

When an aroused citizenry becomes attracted to a man like Donald Trump, however, a conundrum immediately presents itself: After nearly seven years of howling, rightfully, that Mr. Obama has been, politically, an empty suit, devoid of accomplishment and qualification for national leadership, should we now rush to someone we dismissed in earlier years, someone with even LESS governing experience in a democracy than a small town councilman?

Unquestionably, Mr. Trump is a good and well-intentioned man who has done amazingly well in business—where no democratic niceties exist to distract him. The best thing one can say is that despite his flaws, his instincts for national greatness are far superior to those possessed by any Democrat this time around, bar none.

While we should respect Mr. Trump for the energy and passion he has brought to this campaign cycle, his instincts do not equal political leadership, experience, or knowledge. Before issuing his immigration white paper, his off-hand comments the other day about “anchor babies”—to the effect that he would easily “change that” law—should have disturbed many. A man running for president should have already known what’s in our Constitution on the issue, especially since illegal immigration has been the touchstone of his candidacy. After two terms with a president who claims Constitutional Law experience, yet ignores it, could we survive president who seems to know so little about what’s in it?

Wednesday evening, many watched Mr. Trump make more un-thought remarks in New Hampshire. As an unscripted showman, he may be matchless, and he began by mocking and belittling the campaigns of Governors Walker and Bush, and Senator Rubio. Criticizing their positions is always fair game, of course, but he made the attack personal and divisive. “Who?” he said derisively, referring to two twice-elected Governors of important states and an elected U.S. Senator, three accomplished and popular conservatives who have stood the test at the ballot box on 100% more occasions than has the self-described real estate man now before us.

Much of his message is vitally important. Maybe we need to rethink the messenger.