Sarah Jean Seman

Christians are the most persecuted religious group in the world, British Prime Minister David Cameron stated during his annual Easter reception at 10 Downing Street Wednesday. He urged Britain to play a leading role in standing against religious persecution and highlighted three focal points:

The first is to expand the role of faith and faith organisations in our country. This has been a consistent theme of this government; I’m sure there’s more we could do to help make it easier for faith organisations….

Second thing is I hope we can do more to raise the profile of the persecution of Christians around the world. It is the case today that our religion is now the most persecuted religion around the world. I think Britain can play a leading role in this. We have met our obligations in terms of the aid we give to countries around the world. We’re seen as a country which is engaged internationally, and I know that William Hague shares my view about this as does Sayeeda Warsi who leads on this issue in the Foreign Office. We should stand up against persecution of Christians and other religious groups wherever and whenever we can, and should be unashamed in doing so….

This third thing I wanted to say, which I suppose is a little bit more controversial, but I was reflecting on this meeting tonight and what to share with you and I have a thought – which is not a new thought, but I think it is a true thought –which is when I think of the challenges which our churches face in our country and when I think about the challenges political institutions face in our countries – in our country, I see a lot of similarities. We both sometimes can get wrapped up in bureaucracy; we both sometimes can talk endlessly about policies and programmes and plans without explaining what that really means for people’s lives. We can sometimes get obsessed by statistics and figures and how to measure things….Whereas actually, what we both need more of is evangelism.

The Prime Minister also spoke of his recent pilgrimage to Jerusalem where “our Saviour was both crucified and born,” describing it as being a ‘remarkable’ and ‘extraordinary place.’ He also encouraged visitors at his home to ‘fulfill the law of Christ’ and bear one another's burdens.

Christianity remains the religious majority in the United Kingdom. However, the Christian population in England and Wales dropped by four million between 2001 and 2011. Those claiming no religion have increased by 10 percent and the Muslim religion also saw an increase of 1.8 percent.

Watch the video below to learn more of David Cameron’s views on Easter and Christianity:


Sarah Jean Seman

Sarah Jean Seman is a Townhall Web Editor. Follow Sarah Jean Seman on Twitter @sarah_jean_

Author Photo credit: Jensen Sutta Photography