Sarah Jean Seman

Gonzaga University seniors Erik Fagan and Daniel McIntosh were placed on probation Sunday for pulling a pistol on a six-time felon who demanded money from them in their university-owned apartment.

School policy prohibits weapons "at any location on campus, or within University residences." The school board found the students guilty of possessing weapons on school property and of putting others in danger, according to the student's attorney Dean Chuang.

Fagan told the Spokesman-Review they intend to appeal the probation:

“That information is going to be on our educational record, and anytime we go for a job interview and show them our transcripts, that information will be on there. We don’t feel like we should be punished just for defending ourselves."

On the night of Oct. 24, a man, later identified as Jonathan Taylor, pounded on the door of the student’s apartment and asked for cash. Fagan told local ABC News affiliate KHQ he offered him clothes or food instead:

“It was scary. And that’s when he started saying, ‘You don’t want to do this. I just got out of jail. And he lifts up his pant leg and shows some kind of ankle bracelet.”

Taylor began encroaching on the door jam with his hand at the small of his back, according to Daniel McIntosh. As soon as McIntosh pulled his pistol, the man fled. Police captured Taylor a short-time later and confirmed he was a six-time convicted felon.

Despite the fact that McIntosh owned the gun legally, and has a state-issued concealed handgun permit, the school is charging him for breaking university policies. Fagan was also charged, after campus police found he kept his hunting rifle in his apartment.

Common sense and the Second Amendment make this politically correct Washington school board look absurd. Fagan and McIntosh are the type of responsible and quick-thinking individuals we should be applauded in our society, not punishing.

Gonzaga University President promised students he would consider amending the gun policy in an e-mail sent this weekend:

President Thayne McCulloh said as a Jesuit institution dedicated to thoughtful evaluation of complex social issues, he believes this is an opportunity to objectively re-examine their firearms policy.

In spite of the commotion and debate, McIntosh told KHQ even an expulsion would not make him regret his choice to defend himself or others:

"My roommate's life, my life, anybody's life is worth an expulsion in my book."

Hear more of the students' story here:


Sarah Jean Seman

Sarah Jean Seman is a Townhall Web Editor. Follow Sarah Jean Seman on Twitter @sarah_jean_

Author Photo credit: Jensen Sutta Photography