Hillary: The Chinese Would Have Hacked My Phone, Computer in a Nanosecond

Katie Pavlich
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Posted: Mar 18, 2016 10:45 AM
Hillary: The Chinese Would Have Hacked My Phone, Computer in a Nanosecond

When it was revealed a year ago Hillary Clinton used an unsecure, private email server and multiple email addresses to conduct all of her official government business while serving as the Secretary of State, intelligence and security experts warned sensitive information held on Clinton's server was likely hacked by foreign governments. 

During an interview with radio host Hugh Hewitt last year, former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates said specifically it was likely Clinton's server was hacked by the Chinese and the Russians. 

But it turns out, Gates wasn't the only one who knew about this reality. Clinton knew it too.

"Every time I went to countries like China or Russia, I mean we couldn't take our computers, we couldn't take  our personal devices, we couldn't take anything off the plane because they're so good. They would penetrate in a nanosecond," Clinton said during an event in September 2014, nearly two years after leaving the State Department. 

Team Clinton will argue Hillary was referring the Chinese being able to hack her devices while in country, hence why she left everything on the plane. However, this is a false argument. In the age of the internet and global communication, it isn't required for Clinton to physically be in China or Russia in order for top secret government secrets to be stolen off of her home brew, unsecure private email server. In fact, a security review found her server was in fact attacked by hacking sources in China, North Korea and Russia. The review also showed Clinton didn't have the proper security measures in place on her server to prevent top secret information from being compromised. 

Hillary Clinton's private email server containing tens of thousands of messages from her tenure as secretary of state — including more than 400 now considered classified — was the subject of hacking attempts from China, South Korea and Germany after she stepped down in 2013, according to Congressional investigators.

The Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee has found evidence of attempted intrusions into Clinton's server in 2013 and 2014, according to a letter Chairman Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) sent Monday to a Florida-based security firm tasked with protecting the hardware.

The contractor, SECNAP Network Security, identified the attacks, but according to internal emails cited and briefly quoted in the Johnson letter, Clinton's sever may have lacked a threat-detection program for three months, Johnson says.

The attempted security breaches and apparent gaps in protection raise further questions about the level of security Clinton used to prevent malicious intrusions from breaching her network.

This is once again a reminder Clinton put her personal convenience and arrogant need to avoid transparency above the national security of the United States during her time as Secretary of State.