Terry Jeffrey

Sam, the wealthiest man in his neighborhood, lives in a big beautiful house with a massive backyard punctuated by a large, deep swimming pool.

While Sam is personally not very fond of children -- he supports abortion on demand and believes the government should force all employers to offer female workers free sterilizations -- he nonetheless lives in a neighborhood that teems with little ones.

The children are particularly attracted to Sam's beautiful pool -- and, on those rare occasions when Sam is actually in his backyard, he frequently finds himself shooing these children away.

Worried relatives have repeatedly warned Sam that he ought to build a fence around his yard -- or at least around his pool -- to guard against the awful possibility that a neighborhood child might otherwise drown.

But Sam does not want a fence. He objects that it would mar the aesthetics of his yard, and that if some kid really wanted to get into the pool he could climb over the fence. So, should Sam build one? If he went out one morning and found a boy had drowned in his pool, would he have some culpability for that child's unnecessary death?

The answers are yes and yes.

And, although it is not a perfect analogy, Sam's pool is a little like Uncle Sam's territory near our border with Mexico.

There is no doubt people are tempted to enter U.S. property without the permission of the U.S. government.

There is also no doubt this can be a dangerous, even deadly, thing to do.

The Associated Press reported over the weekend on the funeral of 15-year-old Gilberto Francisco Ramos Juarez. The funeral took place in Guatemala, but Gilberto died in Texas.

"The boy's decomposed body was discovered on June 15 in the Rio Grande Valley, not far inside Texas from the border with Mexico," AP reported. "Around his neck was a rosary he had received as a gift for his first communion as a Roman Catholic. Scribbled inside his belt buckle was the phone number of an older brother in Chicago he had hoped to reach. He apparently got lost on his way north and likely died from exposure in hot, dry brush country of South Texas."

This boy obviously believed he could illegally enter the United States and live here.

How did he get that idea? Did U.S. politicians send him that message? Yes, they did.

For years, elected and unelected officials in Washington, D.C., have refused to do their duty to enforce our immigration laws and secure our border.


Terry Jeffrey

Terence P. Jeffrey is the editor-in-chief of CNSNews

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