Scott Erickson

If one were to believe the laudatory tones coming from within the Obama administration following the late-November conclusion of negotiations with Iran over its nuclear program, it would not be unreasonable to conclude that the vast array of threats facing the United States had diminished slightly. As President Obama saw it, the deal his administration reached contained “substantial limitations that will help prevent Iran from creating a nuclear weapon.”

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif also hailed the agreement, stating, "It is important that all of us see the opportunity to end an unnecessary crisis and open new horizons based on respect, based on the rights of the Iranian people and removing any doubts about the exclusively peaceful nature of Iran’s nuclear program.” Zarif went on to conclude, “This is a process of attempting to restore confidence.”

Confidence for Iran, perhaps, but not for the United States. The flawed agreement reached by the Obama administration will only heighten long-term tensions with the Islamic Republic and render U.S. preparations against hostile Iranian provocations an even more dire necessity.

Not only has Iran made clear its intention to continue its enrichment program but Iranian Defense Minister Hossein Dehghan recently went on state TV to tout the increased accuracy of Iran’s ballistic missile strikes. “The inaccuracy of (our) ballistic long-range missiles in hitting targets is so minimal that we can pinpoint targets,” Dehghan boasted.

But the threat is not relegated to Iran alone. North Korea remains a belligerent and unpredictable adversary with a young, capricious leader while the U.S. Missile Defense Agency (MDA) reports that over 6,000 ballistic missiles remain outside the control of the United States, NATO, Russia, and China. MDA expects that number to rise to nearly 8,000 by 2020.

The unpredictable nature of our global adversaries has forced the United States to take whatever measures deemed necessary to protect the homeland.


Scott Erickson

Scott Erickson’s writing has been featured in The Washington Times, The Daily Caller, The Hill, Defense News, and other publications.