Michelle Malkin
"Always remember. Never forget." The phrase is now emblazoned in red across the U.S. Department of Homeland Security website. But as the Obama administration disseminates its talking points to mark the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 jihadist attacks, the White House remains stone-silent about the president's Uncle Omar problem.

The refusal to deal with Uncle Omar tells you everything you need to know about the emptiness and impotence of Washington's 9/11 platitudes.

"Omar" is Onyango Obama, the illegal alien deportation fugitive who is the long-lost Kenyan half-brother of President Obama's father. The president mentioned him in his best-selling book, "Dreams from My Father." But these days, he'd undoubtedly prefer to whitewash him out of the public eye. Last week, Uncle Omar was arrested for drunk driving in Framingham, Mass., and held on an immigration detainer.

The liquor store employee -- yes, he was apparently drinking the inventory that legal Americans weren't drinking -- nearly crashed into a police car and belligerently demanded to ring up the White House. Few in the neighborhood are laughing it off. Just two weeks ago, an illegal alien drunk driver with a mile-long rap sheet mowed down and killed a 23-year-old Milford, Mass., man.

Open-borders advocates will call Uncle Omar "harmless." But it turns out he's not only a repeat deportation absconder who has ignored two court orders to leave the country, but he is also a deadbeat who owes thousands in back taxes and a fraudulent Social Security card-holder who has managed to evade authorities for half a century.

The policy that allowed Omar to disappear is "voluntary departure" -- a security-undermining mechanism that allows illegal alien border-jumpers and visa-overstayers to simply deport themselves after going through the federal immigration court system. Omar lost his first case to stay in the country in 1989; he lost a second bid with the Board of Immigration Appeals in 1992.

Then, as 400,000 to 700,000 illegal alien deportation absconders have done over the past two decades, Omar simply thumbed his nose at the law again and treated his entry into America as an entitlement instead of a privilege.

Omar will now appeal any deportation proceedings a third time with the help of the same Ohio law firm that represented his illegal alien deportation fugitive sister, Zeituni Onyango. Aunt Zeituni arrived in the U.S. in 2000 on a temporary visa. Her asylum request was rejected in 2004. She defied the immigration court order to go back to Kenya, moved into Boston public housing, and hid with relatives for years before winning a second bid to stay in the country she's since trashed publicly numerous times.


Michelle Malkin

Michelle Malkin is the author of "Culture of Corruption: Obama and his Team of Tax Cheats, Crooks & Cronies" (Regnery 2010).

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