Wednesday Waste

John McCaslin
|
Posted: Feb 05, 2009 11:28 AM
Wednesday Waste

Given the current economic crisis that President Obama warns will only get worse before it gets better, Inside the Beltway has inquired why Senate Democrats for a "retreat" Wednesday rented high-end conference space at the glitzy Newseum, just three blocks from the U.S. Capitol, rather than huddling in any number of congressional meeting or hearing rooms.

"No public funds were used," replied Jim Manley, spokesman for Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, Nevada Democrat. "It was paid for by members' re-elect funds. Otherwise, I'll say I have no other comment."

As for senators' re-election funds being spent on party retreats, he said: "You'll have to talk to a campaign lawyer. It is permissible."

He shrugged off utilizing virtually "free" meeting space on Capitol Hill, saying, "What, are you going to call every hearing room ... to find if their available?"

Pam Galloway-Tabb, the Newseum's vice president of general services, declined to say what the Democratic senators were charged for their day-long retreat, which Mr. Obama dropped into during the afternoon. She did confirm that rental rates run as high as $30,000 per day, depending on the size of the space needed.

"I don't give information about any events that are happening at the Newseum," she stressed. "But our rental rates are not hidden."

TWO LISTS

The U.S. Travel Association is applauding the House of Representatives for its overwhelming 413-3 vote in favor of the Fast Redress Act, which would establish a robust appeal and redress process for airline passengers who are wrongly identified as terrorist threats and are delayed or prohibited from boarding a flight.

"It's good to see Congress standing up for the traveler," says association president Roger Dow. "This reform is long overdue."

Under the bill, along with its existing terror suspect list, the Department of Homeland Security would develop a "comprehensive cleared list" shared by federal agencies of individuals who had been previously misidentified. First, the Senate has to approve the legislation.

GANG OF TEN

Not surprisingly, terrorist mastermind Osama bin Laden continues at the top of the FBI's Ten Most Wanted list with a $27 million bounty on his head.

The nine other most wanted men include reputed Boston organized crime leader James J. Bulger, wanted in connection with 19 counts of murder; handsome Jason Derek Brown, an avid golfer, snowboarder and skier who holds a business master's degree, who is wanted for murder in Arizona; former Arizona fireman and hospital technician Robert William Fisher, sought in the slaying of his family in Arizona; repeat killer Glen Stewart Godwin, who has escaped from prisons in Mexico and California; western ranch hand and Mississippi sex-crime suspect Edward Eugene Harper; Los Angeles street gang member Emigdio Preciado Jr.; security guard and Connecticut armed robbery suspect Victor Manuel Gerena; Idaho triple-murder suspect Jorge Alberto Lopez-Orozco; and Alexis Flores, wanted in a Philadelphia child killing.

OUCH!

"Mister Speaker, to paraphrase an old NFL films episode, there are 31 teams in the National Football League, and then there are the Pittsburgh Steelers."

So Rep. Jason Altmire, Pennsylvania Democrat, dared brag on the House floor this week. Mr. Altmire, first elected to Congress in 2006, was a member of Florida State University's first Sugar Bowl championship football team.